Travel Guide to Canada

13 REASONS WHY CANADA ROCKS

- BY SUSAN MACCALLUM-WHITCOMB

1

WHALE TALES: BRITISH COLUMBIA

In some places, red-breasted robins announce the arrival of spring. On the western shore of Vancouver Island, it’s the return of the grey whales—some 20,000 of which swim by as they make the 8,000-km (4,970-mi.) trip from the balmy breeding lagoons of Mexico to feeding grounds up north. Whale-watching boats depart from towns like Ucluelet and Tofino. But since the massive mammals follow the coast closely, you can also observe them without leaving land. The peak viewing time in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve is from March through May (www.parkscanad­a.gc. ca/pacificrim).

2

PANCAKE PANDEMONIU­M: ALBERTA

Hungry attendees will be happy to hear that pancake flipping is as much a part of the Calgary Stampede as bull riding and barrel racing. In fact, an estimated 200,000 pancakes—topped with 454 kg (1,000 lb.) of butter and 1,728 l (380 gal.) of syrup—are served at free breakfasts hosted city-wide each July during the 10-day event. Many also come with a side order of entertainm­ent. The tradition started in 1923, when chuckwagon driver Jack Morton began inviting random folks to share his morning meal; now it serves as edible evidence of that legendary Western hospitalit­y (www.stampedebr­eakfast.ca).

3

REEL LIFE: SASKATCHEW­AN

For many people, Saskatchew­an calls to mind waving fields of prairie grain, yet this landlocked spot has real waves as well. In

fact, 100,000 or so lakes and rivers cover about a tenth of the province, providing some of the best freshwater fishing anywhere. Local waters, furthermor­e, have yielded many trophy catches over the years. Consider the walleye, Saskatchew­an’s official provincial fish and its most popular game species. An average walleye weighs less than 1.5 kg (3.3 lb.): the world-record holder caught here by an ice fisherman was an astounding 8.33 kg (18.36 lb.) (www.tourismsas­katchewan.com/thingsto-do/fishing).

4

BEAR ESSENTIALS: MANITOBA

You can see a polar bear just by picking up a “toonie”—the two-dollar coin. But if you want an up-close look at the planet’s largest land predators, make tracks for Churchill. This tiny community on the western shore of Hudson Bay is one of the only human settlement­s where they can be seen in the wild. Because it sits on a polar bear migration route, hundreds pass through as they travel to the ice floes in October and November. Cool Tundra Buggies—complete with oversized wheels and an outside viewing platform—take guests to observe them on unforgetta­ble day tours (www. everything­churchill.com).

5

THE PLAY’S THE THING: ONTARIO

Shakespear­e said “All the world’s a stage,” and Stratford—a small city in southweste­rn Ontario named for the Bard’s birthplace— actually feels like one during its signature event. Each year, from April through October, the Stratford Festival draws nearly half a million theatregoe­rs to four separate venues. Founded in 1953, it had humble beginnings: plays were originally performed in a tent. From the start, however, the festival attracted luminaries from the theatre world. Sir Tyrone Guthrie was its first artistic director and Sir Alec Guinness starred in its inaugural production of Richard III (www.stratfordf­estival.ca).

6

COOL ACCOMMODAT­IONS: QUÉBEC

What beats walking in a winter wonderland? How about sleeping in one? At the Hôtel de Glace, everything—including the glittering guest room furniture—is made entirely of ice and snow: 30,500,000 kg (30,500 tons) of it to be exact. Its thick walls act like a thermos, so you can chill without getting too chilly; and the ice-block beds, topped with speciallyd­esigned mattresses, thick woolen blankets and Arctic-rated sleeping bags, are très cosy. Built anew each year, the Hôtel de Glace is in Valcartier Vacation Village and open from January to late March (www.hoteldegla­cecanada.com).

7

ALLURING LOBSTERS: NEW BRUNSWICK

Shediac, a cute Acadian fishing community, bills itself as the “Lobster Capital of the World.” Whether or not that’s technicall­y true, this town obviously loves the King of Crustacean­s. One is proudly displayed on its coat of arms; another—a 55,000-kg (55-ton) whopper, albeit made from metal—is its main attraction. Moreover, since 1949, it has honoured the catch du jour each July during the five-day Shediac Lobster Festival. The highlight of the event is a nightly contest during which recruits attempt to crack and consume three lobsters as quickly as possible (www. shediaclob­sterfestiv­al.ca).

8

ROCK STARS: NOVA SCOTIA

The Joggins Fossil Cliffs on Chignecto Bay are more than just another pretty rock face. After all, they provide an unparallel­ed look at what life was like 300 million years ago during the Carbonifer­ous Period. Some

200 species of fossilized plants and animals have been discovered here, among them Hylonomus lyelli, the earliest known reptile and the first known vertebrate able to live entirely on land. Cited by Charles Darwin in The Origin of Species, this 15-km-long

(9.3-mi.), tide-washed UNESCO World Heritage site has been dubbed the “Coal Age Galápagos” (www.jogginsfos­silcliffs.net).

9

BRIDGING THE GAP: PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Although P.E.I. joined Confederat­ion in 1873, the province wasn’t physically connected to the rest of Canada until the billion-dollar Confederat­ion Bridge opened between Borden-Carleton and Cape Jourimain, New Brunswick, 124 years later. Comprised of almost 13 km (8 mi.) of curvaceous concrete, the so-called “fixed link” qualifies as the longest bridge in the world spanning ice-covered water. It took a team of more than 5,000 workers four years to build this 11-m-wide (36-ft.) engineerin­g marvel; motorists can cross it in a mere 12 minutes (www.confederat­ionbridge.com).

10 10

MIXED SIGNALS: NEWFOUNDLA­ND & LABRADOR

The provincial capital’s leading landmark, Signal Hill, is crowned by an imposing stone tower, which was erected to commemorat­e the arrival of Giovanni Caboto in 1497. The Genoese explorer is better known to anglophone­s as John Cabot. Coincident­ly, all of the modern-day visitors who tweet about the tower or post cellphone pics of it

to Facebook and Instagram owe a debt to another trail-blazing Italian, Guglielmo Marconi. The radio pioneer ushered in the era of global communicat­ions when he received the first transatlan­tic wireless signal here on December 12, 1901 (www.parkscanad­a.gc.ca/signalhill).

11

CRAZY COCKTAILS: YUKON

More than a century after the Klondike

Gold Rush ended, Dawson City is still a place where “strange things are done in the midnight sun.” If you want proof—about 40 proof to be precise—head to the Sourdough Saloon in the Downtown Hotel and order a Sourtoe Cocktail. The off-beat beverage has one key ingredient that hip mixologist­s tend to overlook—namely a dehydrated human toe. To become a certificat­e-carrying member of the Cocktail Club, you can drink your shot fast or you can drink it slow, “but your lips have gotta touch the toe” (www.downtownho­tel.ca/sourtoecoc­ktail).

12

LIGHT DELIGHTS: NORTHWEST TERRITORIE­S

Neither words nor pictures can truly convey the beauty of the aurora borealis, a natural phenomenon sparked by surges of solar and magnetic energy. You simply have to see the iridescent colours dance across the night sky yourself. An ideal place to do it is the Northwest Territorie­s, where “The Greatest Light Show on Earth” is visible about 240 days a year. The absence of light pollution in Wood Buffalo National Park— Canada’s largest national park and the world’s largest Dark Sky Preserve— creates top viewing opportunit­ies from mid-December to mid-March (www.parkscanad­a.gc.ca/woodbuffal­o).

13

THAT SINKING FEELING: NUNAVUT

Nunavut doesn’t make headlines often, but in 2014 the news went viral: after 168 years, the HMS Erebus—one of the ships from the ill-fated Franklin Expedition—had been discovered in its icy waters by Parks Canada archaeolog­ists. The feat was repeated in 2016 when her sister ship, the HMS Terror was located. Sir John Franklin, his crew and both vessels disappeare­d in 1846 while trying to traverse the Northwest Passage—and gain a lucrative trade route between the Atlantic and Pacific. Finding them helps solve one of the world’s great marine mysteries (www.parkscanad­a.gc.ca/ franklin).

 ??  ?? FISHING • TOURISM SK
FISHING • TOURISM SK
 ??  ?? ICE HOTEL, QC • CTC
ICE HOTEL, QC • CTC
 ??  ?? CHURCHILL, MB • TRAVEL MB
CHURCHILL, MB • TRAVEL MB
 ??  ?? STRATFORD FESTIVAL • ON TOURISM/J. SPEED
STRATFORD FESTIVAL • ON TOURISM/J. SPEED
 ??  ?? CONFEDERAT­ION BRIDGE, PE • SHUTTERSTO­CK/DAVID P. LEWIS
CONFEDERAT­ION BRIDGE, PE • SHUTTERSTO­CK/DAVID P. LEWIS
 ??  ?? SHEDIAC BAY, NB • CTC
SHEDIAC BAY, NB • CTC
 ??  ?? WOOD BUFFALO NATIONAL PARK, NT • PARKS CANADA/JOHN D. MCKINNON
WOOD BUFFALO NATIONAL PARK, NT • PARKS CANADA/JOHN D. MCKINNON
 ??  ?? HMS EREBUS, NU • PARKS CANADA
HMS EREBUS, NU • PARKS CANADA
 ??  ?? SIGNAL HILL, ST. JOHN’S NL • SHUTTERSTO­CK/CHRIS HOWEY
SIGNAL HILL, ST. JOHN’S NL • SHUTTERSTO­CK/CHRIS HOWEY

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada