What ev­ery home of­fice needs

Be at your most pro­duc­tive in a space that’s both ef­fi­cient and com­fort­able

Truro Daily News - - SALTWIRE HOMES - NANCY MATTIA CTW FEA­TURES

If you’re go­ing to be work­ing re­motely, there’s no bet­ter time than now to set up an of­fice in your home. Work­ing from home can help in­crease your pro­duc­tiv­ity and de­crease stress. And the com­mute can’t be beat! Put some thought into how you want the of­fice to look — in the same style as the rest of the house or some­thing com­pletely dif­fer­ent? Since you’ll be spend­ing much time in the space, it should feel good to be there.

Be­low, a must-have list of what a home of­fice needs, plus some things you might want and some you def­i­nitely don’t:

AB­SO­LUTELY NEC­ES­SARY

A DED­I­CATED WORK­PLACE Just as an of­fice worker sits at the same desk in the same room ev­ery day, you also should set up a place where you go to work ev­ery day. Whether it’s a spare bed­room, an at­tic, or a cor­ner in the din­ing room, hav­ing a place that’s quiet and prefer­ably has a door that closes will make get­ting busi­ness done much eas­ier.

GOOD LIGHT­ING

Even think­ing about set­ting up your of­fice in a dark place like the base­ment can make you feel unin­spired. Avoid a gloomy lo­cale and choose a sunny, well-ven­ti­lated place in­stead; ex­tra points if there’s a nice view. What if your of­fice doesn’t have much nat­u­ral light? “Look into var­i­ous sources of (ar­ti­fi­cial) light,” says Lori Weatherly, an in­te­rior de­signer in Maple­wood, NJ, “such as over­head, task, even the com­puter screen, which gen­er­ates a great deal of fo­cal point light.”

AN AD­JUSTABLE DESK AND CHAIR

You’ve got to be com­fort­able sit­ting at your desk ev­ery day with­out get­ting an achy back or stiff neck. Test out sev­eral desk and chair com­bos to see which pro­vides the most sup­port be­fore buy­ing.

STOR­AGE

For most work­ers, the days of mul­ti­ple file cab­i­nets are long gone. “Use dig­i­tal stor­age for as much as pos­si­ble,” says Weatherly, “and al­lo­cate a dis­creet amount of stor­age space for the rest.”

NICE BUT NOT ES­SEN­TIAL HOUSEPLANT­S

It’s a fact that the colour green has a calm­ing ef­fect on peo­ple. Dec­o­rat­ing your of­fice with a green plant or two will not only cre­ate a feel-good link to na­ture but it will help you relax when you’re on dead­line.

A COM­FORT­ABLE COUCH

No one should sit for long pe­ri­ods of time in one place. Get up fre­quently from your chair, stretch your arms and legs, take a walk, then grab your lap­top and work from the couch. Hav­ing mul­ti­ple work­sta­tions with dif­fer­ent views may keep you more alert.

AVOID

A TAN­GLE OF POWER CORDS They make a room in­stantly look messy and dis­or­ga­nized. If your desk doesn’t come with a hidden charg­ing sta­tion or power cen­tre, plug all the cords into a power strip or get a charg­ing sta­tion with mul­ti­ple USB ports. Cords can also bound to­gether with ny­lon bundling straps. If the room has only one elec­tri­cal out­let and it’s poorly lo­cated, hire an elec­tri­cian to add a floor out­let.

A TV

When a big screen is that close, you may be tempted to find out what Rachael Ray is cook­ing that day. Put up a colour­ful print on the wall in­stead.

GETTY IM­AGES/STOCK PHOTO

Whether it’s a spare bed­room, an at­tic, or a cor­ner in the din­ing room, hav­ing a place that’s quiet and prefer­ably has a door that closes will make get­ting busi­ness done much eas­ier.

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