Fu­elling prop­erly for your run or walk

Vancouver Sun - - YOU - — Lynn Kanuka

TIME YOUR MEALS AND SNACKS

Fuel fre­quently in your day, keep­ing meals and snacks within a three- to four-hour time frame to pre­vent en­ergy drops dur­ing your day, con­trol crav­ings and over-eat­ing.

NEVER TRAIN ON A GROWLING STOM­ACH

It will af­fect the qual­ity of your ses­sion and may lead to overeat­ing af­ter. Choose the fol­low­ing:

foods you’re fa­mil­iar with to avoid upset stom­ach;

low-fat and mod­er­ateto low-fi­bre foods;

carb-rich and pro­tein-mod­er­ate foods.

This can be a snack like yo­gurt and fruit or a peanut but­ter and ba­nana sand­wich if train­ing in the af­ter­noon. Make sure to ex­per­i­ment to find what works for you and to leave about an hour di­ges­tion time if hav­ing a snack, or two hours if hav­ing a meal.

FUEL UP POST-TRAIN­ING

Fu­elling within two hours will help en­sure mus­cle re­pair, en­ergy re­plen­ish­ment and pre­pare your body for your next train­ing.

Ex­am­ples of morn­ing re­cov­ery foods are overnight oats topped with fruits and nuts, or a smoothie made with yo­gurt or milk and fruits, or it could be your din­ner meal if train­ing in the af­ter­noon or evening.

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