Shang­hai lifts hur­dle for for­eign ex­perts

Fast-track ap­proval is now in place for highly skilled over­seas work­ers seek­ing res­i­dence per­mits

China Daily European Weekly - - China News - By ZHOU WENTING in Shang­hai zhouwent­ing@chi­nadaily.com.cn

“High-end pro­fes­sion­als em­ployed by the 8,818 en­ter­prises on a list seen as key lead­ers in Shang­hai’s quest to be­come a global tech­no­log­i­cal in­no­va­tion hub by 2030 will also be­come ben­e­fi­cia­ries of the new mea­sure.” XIN WENKE em­ployee of the Exit-En­try Ad­min­is­tra­tion Bu­reau

Shang­hai stream­lined pro­ce­dures on April 2 for highly skilled for­eign­ers work­ing in the mu­nic­i­pal­ity to get their res­i­dence per­mits within three work­ing days through an on­line ap­pli­ca­tion, the mu­nic­i­pal­ity’s lat­est mea­sure to at­tract such over­seas work­ers.

High-level pro­fes­sion­als, iden­ti­fied by na­tional or Shang­hai au­thor­i­ties who man­age hu­man re­sources or for­eign ex­perts af­fairs, will only need to go to the web­site crj.po­lice.sh.cn and sub­mit doc­u­ments, ac­cord­ing to the Exit-En­try Ad­min­is­tra­tion Bu­reau of the Shang­hai Pub­lic Se­cu­rity Bu­reau. They can re­trieve their per­mits at exit-en­try of­fices af­ter three work­ing days.

“High-end pro­fes­sion­als em­ployed by the 8,818 en­ter­prises on a list seen as key lead­ers in Shang­hai’s quest to be­come a global tech­no­log­i­cal in­no­va­tion hub by 2030 will also be­come ben­e­fi­cia­ries of the new mea­sure,” says Xin Wenke of the in­for­ma­tion of­fice of the Exit-En­try Ad­min­is­tra­tion Bu­reau.

The en­ter­prises in­clude high­tech and new tech­nol­ogy com­pa­nies or those in fi­nance and strate­gic emerg­ing fields, re­gional head­quar­ters of multi­na­tional com­pa­nies, and re­search and devel­op­ment cen­ters that in­clude for­eign in­vest­ment.

The ini­tia­tive in Shang­hai, the first and the only one in the coun­try, sim­pli­fies ap­pli­ca­tion pro­ce­dures and as­sists the es­tab­lish­ment of a tal­ent sys­tem that is glob­ally com­pet­i­tive, the bu­reau says.

Be­fore the mea­sure was un­veiled, ap­pli­cants had to visit exit-en­try of­fices and go through the for­mal­i­ties in per­son. The of­fices some­times re­quired in­ter­views or sup­ple­men­tary ma­te­ri­als. The pro­ce­dure, from start to fin­ish, typ­i­cally took seven work­ing days.

Mea­sures were un­veiled in Shang­hai in 2015 aimed at at­tract­ing tal­ented peo­ple from over­seas. In Jan­uary, ap­pli­ca­tion re­quire­ments for per­ma­nent res­i­dency were fur­ther eased for the core for­eign mem­bers of top sci­en­tific re­search teams and out­stand­ing for­eign uni­ver­sity grad­u­ates who had worked in the city for three straight years.

Also on April 2, Shang­hai granted a per­ma­nent res­i­dence card, known as the Chi­nese green card, to a No­bel Prize lau­re­ate for the first time.

Kurt Wuthrich, from Switzer­land, who won the No­bel Prize for chem­istry in 2002 and is a chaired pro­fes­sor at Shang­haiTech Uni­ver­sity, was the re­cip­i­ent.

Shang­hai po­lice de­clined to re­veal the num­ber of ex­pa­tri­ates hold­ing Chi­nese green cards in the mu­nic­i­pal­ity. Ac­cord­ing to the Min­istry of Pub­lic Se­cu­rity, in 2016 alone 1,576 for­eign­ers be­came per­ma­nent res­i­dents in China, up by 163 per­cent year-on-year.

Chi­nese green cards be­came ma­chine-read­able in July to make for­eign per­ma­nent res­i­dents’ daily lives and work eas­ier. Sim­i­lar to the se­cond gen­er­a­tion of Chi­nese cit­i­zens’ ID cards, the smart cards con­tain a chip in which the for­eigner’s iden­tity in­for­ma­tion is kept, and the in­for­ma­tion is shared with rail­ways, air­lines, ho­tels and banks.

YIN LIQIN / CHINA NEWS SER­VICE

No­bel Prize lau­re­ate Kurt Wuthrich (left) of Switzer­land re­ceives a per­ma­nent res­i­dence card, along with five oth­ers, in Shang­hai on April 2

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