DPRK-US sum­mit a go in Sin­ga­pore

Talks sup­ported by For­eign Min­istry, which hopes for peace on penin­sula

China Daily (Latin America Weekly) - - Front Page - By PAN MENGQI pan­mengqi@chi­nadaily.com.cn

Repub­lic of Korea Pres­i­dent Moon Jae-in con­firmed on Sun­day the will­ing­ness of Kim Jong-un, top leader of the Demo­cratic Peo­ple’s Repub­lic of Korea, and US Pres­i­dent Don­ald Trump to hold the first-ever DPRK-US sum­mit as sched­uled next month.

Moon de­liv­ered a na­tion­ally tele­vised ad­dress at the pres­i­den­tial com­plex, say­ing both Kim and Trump “whole­heart­edly” wished the suc­cess of their sum­mit, orig­i­nally sched­uled for June 12 in Sin­ga­pore.

For­eign Min­istry spokesman Lu Kang said on Sun­day that China firmly sup­ports the DPRK and US lead­ers’ will­ing­ness to hold the sum­mit, ex­pect­ing it not only to be held as sched­uled but also to suc­cess­fully bring peace to the Korean Penin­sula.

Lu said China al­ways has be­lieved that di­rect di­a­logue be­tween the United States and the DPRK is the key to re­solv­ing is­sues of mu­tual con­cern on the Korean Penin­sula and the min­istry hopes both coun­tries can cher­ish the re­cent progress achieved on the penin­sula.

On Satur­day, Trump told re­porters at the White House that he is look­ing for­ward to the sum­mit in Sin­ga­pore. “It hasn’t changed,” Trump said, adding that talks were pro­gress­ing well.

Trump can­celed the sched­uled meet­ing on Thurs­day, say­ing that it would not hap­pen “based on the tremen­dous anger and open hos­til­ity” dis­played in the DPRK’s most re­cent state­ments at that time.

How­ever, he re­versed course just one day later. Both sides wanted the meet­ing to hap­pen and it could still go ahead af­ter pro­duc­tive talks, he said.

Hours ear­lier, be­fore Trump’s state­ment call­ing to con­tinue the sum­mit, the DPRK’s of­fi­cial Korean Cen­tral News Agency said Kim ex­pressed his “fixed will” to hold the sum­mit.

Kim made the re­marks when hav­ing his sec­ond meet­ing with Moon at the truce vil­lage Pan­munjom on Satur­day.

Dur­ing the Satur­day meet­ing, Py­ongyang and Seoul agreed to hold an­other high­level talk on Fri­day that will be fol­lowed by in­ter-Korean mil­i­tary talks to ease ten­sions and a Red Cross talk to hold the re­union of sep­a­rated fam­i­lies across the in­ter-Korean bor­der since the 1950-53 Korean War ended in an armistice, ac­cord­ing to the ROK pres­i­den­tial of­fice.

Lyu Chao, di­rec­tor of the Bor­der Study In­sti­tute at the Liaon­ing Academy of So­cial Sciences, said it should be rec­og­nized that the set­tle­ment of the nu­clear is­sue is an ex­tremely com­pli­cated process.

“It does not hap­pen overnight,” he said, adding that Trump’s course re­ver­sal fully demon­strated that the Korean Penin­sula is­sues re­quire more cau­tious de­ci­sions and should not be made im­pul­sively.

Wash­ing­ton’s de­mand for a “com­plete, ver­i­fi­able and ir­re­versible de­nu­cle­ariza­tion” is in­con­sis­tent with Py­ongyang’s in­ten­tion to achieve de­nu­cle­ariza­tion grad­u­ally, said Zheng Jiy­ong, di­rec­tor of the Korea Re­search Cen­ter at Fu­dan Univer­sity, adding that the ideal way to work on the is­sue is that both par­ties can “move to­ward the same goal, make con­ces­sions, and show their sin­cer­ity”, he said.

On Satur­day Kim and Moon also an­nounced that the two lead­ers would meet fre­quently in the fu­ture to make di­a­logue brisk and to pool wis­dom and ef­forts, and also promised to fur­ther push for­ward the peace process on the Korean Penin­sula by work­ing to­ward de­nu­cle­ariza­tion and im­proved in­ter-Korean ties.

China firmly sup­ports the DPRK and US lead­ers’ will­ing­ness to hold the sum­mit, ex­pect­ing it not only to be held as sched­uled but also to suc­cess­fully bring peace to the Korean Penin­sula.

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