UP­STAIRS RE­SORT

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Over­look­ing Tai Tam Bay, the rooftop is one of the most fre­quently used spa­ces in Vic­to­ria Allen's home, decked out in trop­ics-in­spired pops of yel­low and cosy out­door fur­ni­ture.

樓上風光

飽覽大潭灣美景的天台是Vic­to­ria Al­len家最常用的空間,並以充滿熱帶風情的黃色調和舒適的戶外傢具佈置。

“De­sign­ing a chair pre­sents the op­por­tu­nity to ex­press my po­si­tion — it is like a test­ing ground for ideas that in­ter­est me,” renowned Ghana­ian-Bri­tish ar­chi­tect Sir David Ad­jaye once said when asked about why chair de­sign is seen as a rite of pas­sage for ar­chi­tects. In the same way, at least in Hong Kong’s ut­terly unique hous­ing mar­ket, in­te­rior de­sign­ers are in­creas­ingly see­ing mi­cro-flats in the same light, as the purest ex­pres­sion of their core de­sign prin­ci­ples.

To YC Chen of hoo, this ex­er­cise be­gan in earnest when he and project lead Ar­san Law were tasked by a young fe­male pro­fes­sional to re­design a stu­dio unit that clocked out at a mere 340sqft – the small­est apart­ment in his port­fo­lio by far. Es­sen­tially a sin­gle room, Florence, as this project would be chris­tened, pre­sented a “trilemma” whereby the client could only ever choose two out of the fol­low­ing three pieces of fur­ni­ture: a sofa, a bed, or a din­ing ta­ble. To have all three, the only so­lu­tion, as is so of­ten the case in Hong Kong, was to build up­wards.

IN­TE­RIOR DE­SIGN­ERS ARE IN­CREAS­INGLY SEE­ING MI­CRO-FLATS AS THE PUREST EX­PRES­SION OF THEIR CORE DE­SIGN PRIN­CI­PLES

「設計座椅就等同讓我有機會表達自己的立場位置,有如試驗讓我感興趣的意念。」英籍迦納裔建築師Sir David Ad­jaye被問到座椅設計何以被視為建築師必經過程時這樣回答。同樣地,處身香港極為獨特的房屋市場中,室內設計師也漸漸會把小單位項目看成展現自己核心創作價值的最佳機會。

對hoo的YC Chen來說,早在他和項目經理Ar­san Law獲一位年輕專業女性委託重新設計僅有340平方呎的工作室單位時(他目前處理過最小巧的項目),經已萌生這種概念。嚴格來說,是次只能容下一個空間的設計項目Florence令客人只能在沙發、睡床和餐桌三者之間選其二。要三者兼得,唯一可行的方案,就只能遵從處身香港最常見的做法:往上發展。

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