AMPHIBIOUS ALLURE

A Symbiosis of Design and Engineering built for Adventure

Jet Asia Pacific - - Feature - Demo flight / Text by Anthony Lam

An airplane, a speedboat, or a sports car — which would you prefer spending your afternoon in the Bahamas in? Well, how about all three? Enter: the ICON A5 amphibious aircraft. I was recently invited to visit ICON’S corporate headquarters and flight training center in Vacaville, California. My purpose was to tour ICON’S production facilities and demo fly their A5 over Napa. As a seaplane rated private pilot with experience flying a variety of aircraft — including the Citabria, Cirruses, and the Super Cub on floats — I was very curious to experience what the ICON A5 had to offer to both novice and veteran aviators alike. So hop in with me and find out for yourself.

The ICON A5 was developed from a clean-sheet, stateof-the-art design as a two-seater Light Sport category aircraft. Conceptualized from the ground up for ultra adventure, the A5’s wings can fold back so that the aircraft can easily fit in a trailer, garage, or hangar and be towed out in your Range Rover or SUV for your next flying excursion. First-rate engineering doesn’t end with the wings either — the A5’s cockpit interior was originally designed by BMW’S Designworks then later by the renowned Lotus Engineering, the same company that helped develop the Tesla Roadster. The A5’s exterior was likewise designed by the coveted Nissan/infiniti lead designer Randy Rodriguez (who has since joined Tesla). The A5 is powered by the independent Bombardier Recreational Products’s proven Rotax 912 is engine — widely considered as one of the most reliable engines for LSAS today and powerable by both 100LL or Unleaded 91 Octane automobile fuel, so you can fuel up the A5 at an airport, gas station when it’s on a trailer, or at a marina. With the A5’s unobstructed bubble canopy and propellers situated behind the

YOU CAN FUEL UP THE A5 AT AN AIRPORT, GAS STATION WHEN IT’S ON A TRAILER, OR AT A MARINA.

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