The An­ton Va­lley

Excelencias Turísticas del caribe y las Américas (Centroamerica) - - Charming Places - By: Ana Gar­cía Pho­tos: TETEOLIVELLA.COM

Down in the An­ton Va­lley, a le­gend has been ma­king the rounds. Word is Wind­flo­wer, the gor­geo­us daugh­ter of Chief Mag­pie, on­ce li­ved he­re and when Spa­nish con­quis­ta­dors arri­ved in the Isth­mus, the lo­vely Wind­flo­wer fell in love with one of the His­pa­nic gentle­men. But Ya­ra­vi, the hef­tiest and most coura­geo­us tri­be mem­ber, had a crush of his own on Mag­pie’s daugh­ter. When he lear­ned that Wind­flo­wer had gi­ven her love to one of the con­quis­ta­dors, he de­ci­ded to kill him­self and jum­ped from the top of a moun­tain as Wind­flo­wer wat­ched in ama­ze­ment.

The prin­cess, hit hard by Ya­ra­vi’s death, for­got about his be­lo­ved Spa­niard and star­ted roa­ming the moun­tains full of so­rrow and tears un­til death took her aback whi­le she was lea­ning on a hill­top with her eyes sta­ring up at the sky.

The le­gend goes that na­tu­re, mo­ved by the sad love story, in­sis­ted in per­pe­tua­ting the sil­houet­te of the lea­ning prin­cess. Sin­ce then, tho­se who arri­ve in the An­ton Va­lley can ma­ke out an as­toun­ding moun­tain that juts out of the rid­ge and re­sem­bles a slee­ping In­dian wo­man.

The An­ton Va­lley, lo­ca­ted in the cen­tral pro­vin­ce of Co­cle, just a two-hour dri­ve down the Pan American Road, com­pri­ses 22 mi­les of breath­ta­king sce­nery trap­ped bet­ween low­lands and peaks.

The Va­lley is al­so known as Pa­na­ma’s ever­green. Its charms and bu­co­lic at­mosp­he­re ha­ve prom­pted many wri­ters to co­me over the­re for me­di­ta­tion. Only on wee­kends the tra­di­tio­nal quiet­ness of the su­rroun­dings is bro­ken by flocks of lo­cal and fo­reign tou­rists who head for this neck of the Pa­na­ma­nian woods in search of so­me laid­back re­la­xa­tion.

The pla­ce stands at over 600 yards over sea le­vel and its weat­her is both mild and balmy. Ac­cor­ding to

Na­tu­re works in very mys­te­rious ways that ha­ve ins­pi­red won­der­ful le­gends. Many re­lie­ve charms re­mind us of hu­man or ani­mal sha­pes that un­ra­vel countless fan­ta­sies in our minds. Re­gard­less of whet­her tho­se lar­ger-than-li­fe sto­ries are true or fal­se, they are ac­tually crow­ned by a ha­lo. That’s the ca­se of the Slee­ping In­dian Wo­man

geo­lo­gists, the va­lley is the for­mer cra­ter of a vol­cano. That ex­plains the abun­dan­ce of hills and vol­ca­nic rocks on the pre­mi­ses.

Tho­se vi­si­ting the An­ton Va­lley ha­ve the op­por­tu­nity of re­kind­ling the le­gend if they ma­ke up their minds to em­bark on the hour-and-a-half climb of the moun­tain. At the on­set, you’ll hit on well-known Pie­dra Pin­ta­da (Pain­ted Sto­ne), that scho­lars pen­cil in as a ma­kes­hift map of the va­lley that shows the lo­cal pe­tro­graphy car­ved by the in­di­ge­nous dwe­llers in their ef­fort to re­co­unt their own his­tory.

Anot­her point of the clam­be­ring pro­cess ta­kes vi­si­tors up to the heights that har­bor th­ree springs known as Los Es­con­di­dos, Los Enamo­ra­dos and el Sal­to del Sa­po. The lat­ter is next to ot­her sto­ne-car­ved dra­wings si­mi­lar to tho­se found at Pie­dra Pin­ta­da.

To reach the top of the Slee­ping In­dian Wo­man, tra­ve­lers may eit­her climb on foot up the path­way next to the Pain­ted Sto­ne, or dri­ve their way up on AWD vehi­cles that can climb the Ca­mino de la Cruz tho­rough­fa­re.

On­ce on top of the moun­tain, tou­rists will im­me­dia­tely feel a breezy cli­ma­te and en­joy spec­ta­cu­lar views at a height of mo­re than 700 yards abo­ve sea le­vel.

The Va­lley is al­so known as Pa­na­ma’s ever­green. Its charms and bu­co­lic at­mosp­he­re ha­ve prom­pted many wri­ters to co­me over the­re for me­di­ta­tion

The pla­ce stands at over 600 yards over sea le­vel and its weat­her is both mild and balmy.

El Cho­rro in the An­to’n Va­lley

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