“En­tren­ched” in a Hea­ling Heat

A TOWN IN THE VENEZUELAN STA­TE OF CARABOBO, PER­CHED ON A MOUNTAINOUS EN­VI­RON­MENT LADEN WITH LAVISH FOLIAGE, HARBORS THE WORLD’S SE­COND-BEST HOT SPRINGS

Excelencias Turísticas del caribe y las Américas - - Hacen Magia / Doing Magic -

Its na­me har­kens back to the ti­mes of the co­lo­nial ru­le, when forts we­re built on the pre­mi­ses and we­re ca­lled “Las Trin­che­ras de Aguas Ca­lien­tes” in a bid to pre­vent pi­ra­tes from ran­sac­king and loo­ting lo­ca­tions

Qui­te li­kely, warmth was the first thing hu­man beings first sought for. For ages peo­ple ha­ve said ti­me and again that work ship­ped man­kind in­to sha­pe, but sa­ying that heat ma­de that pos­si­ble is no un­ders­ta­te­ment. Plea­su­re and health are lin­ked to cli­ma­te, so that ex­plains why that when it co­mes to tra­ve­ling, we al­ways ta­ke a clo­ser look at tem­pe­ra­tu­res. And it's that in­quiry the one that can bring us straight to such pla­ces as Las Trin­che­ras (The Tren­ches) ther­mal cen­ter.

Nestled in the sta­te of Carabobo, in the town of Trin­che­ras, and hem­med in by a mountainous en­vi­ron­ment laden with lavish foliage, the com­plex boasts the se­cond most im­por­tant hot springs in the world in terms of tem­pe­ra­tu­re (92 de­grees Cel­sius) and the num­ber one around the globe as far as che­mi­cal com­po­si­tion and hea­ling po­wers are con­cer­ned. It's way too hard to pass up the chan­ce to relax in such a pla­ce. Stress, the so-ca­lled epi­de­mic of our cen­tury, has in this South Ame­ri­can en­cla­ve a

for­mi­da­ble foe. Mus­cle re­la­xa­tion, blood oxy­ge­na­tion and ce­llu­lar re­ju­ve­na­tion are th­ree of the be­ne­fits that wa­ter can turn li­ke magic for tho­se who ma­ke up their minds to call that pla­ce their se­cret ge­ta­way, far from the worldly noi­se.

This ha­ven of pea­ce has 103 ho­tel rooms whe­re guests can choose bet­ween dou­ble rooms, exe­cu­ti­ve, co­lo­nial and tri­ple. From the co­zi­ness of their rooms, they can hand­pick the right ti­me for them to ma­ke use of the spa. The warm whirl­pool jet and the mud pool are highly ac­clai­med among vi­si­tors.

Pu­re magic ro­lling down from the moun­tain. Des­pi­te the waf­ting steam that re­sem­bles what ma­gi­cians usually do on sta­ge with their hat tricks and magic wands, this is no doubt cer­ti­fied magic at its best. Pa­tients suf­fe­ring from arth­ri­tis, back­bo­ne con­di­tions, rheu­ma­tism, as well as mus­cu­lar, res­pi­ra­tory, di­ges­ti­ve, gy­ne­co­lo­gi­cal, trau­ma­tic and der­ma­to­lo­gi­cal di­sor­ders get re­mar­kably well in a couple of sha­kes. In the mean­ti­me, the charm of the pla­ce and the qua­lity of the ser­vi­ce ma­ke them for­get that they on­ce got the­re suf­fe­ring from so­me kind of acu­te body pain or dis­com­fort.

A pla­ce li­ke this deser­ves the his­tory it trea­su­res. Its na­me har­kens back to the ti­mes of the co­lo­nial ru­le, when forts we­re built on the pre­mi­ses and we­re ca­lled “Las Trin­che­ras de Aguas Ca­lien­tes” (The Hot Wa­ters Tren­ches) in a bid to pre­vent pi­ra­tes –tho­se an­no­ying vi­si­tors who had no bea­ring with tourism- from ran­sac­king and loo­ting lo­ca­tions bet­ween Puer­to Ca­be­llo and Va­len­cia. As ti­me ro­lled on, the na­med was clip­ped to “Aguas Ca­lien­tes” (Hot Wa­ters), and that mo­ni­ker still holds wa­ter, es­pe­cially at the ther­mal cen­ter.

And the­re's mo­re. The le­gend goes that the energy of the Guai­cai­pu­ro, Ta­ma­na­co, Ca­ya­re, Yo­ra­co and Cha­rai­ma ca­me pre­ci­sely from tho­se springs, to which se­ve­ral tri­bes used to drop by on a re­gu­lar basis in search of health, vi­gor and coura­ge. Ch­ro­ni­cles ha­ve it that in an en­vi­ron­ment of ma­gi­cal ri­tuals, on the ver­ge of tem­po­rary huts erec­ted for the es­tan­cia, wa­rriors strengt­he­ned them­sel­ves in tho­se wa­ters, whi­le the sick and the old re­cei­ved re­ne­wed mo­xie from the heat.

It is al­so said that the hot springs we­re re­dis­co­ve­red –li­ke vir­tually everyt­hing el­se in the Americas- in the early 19th cen­tury by Agus­tín Co­daz­zi and Ale­jan­dro de Hum­boldt. The lat­ter, who ex­plai­ned to the world li­ke no one el­se the spi­rit and nature of the Ame­ri­can peo­ple, pro­bably took a few good dips in tho­se springs be­fo­re put­ting out his first stu­dies on this na­tu­ral the­rapy.

From then to da­te, pre­si­dents, go­ver­nors, mem­ber of par­lia­ments, ar­tists, spor­ts­men, scien­tists and, abo­ve all, or­di­nary peo­ple, ha­ve sta­yed at the com­plex on a quest –li­ke the tri­be of pea­ce- for har­mony and con­cord, with them­sel­ves and with ot­hers. Right at Las Trin­che­ras, right in the midd­le of their pools or mud ponds, it is easy to tra­vel back in ti­me thou­sands of years and re­mem­ber that, li­ke ow­ners of a ther­mal pla­net, warmth is the one thing the hu­man ra­ce built on.

The le­gend goes that the energy of the Guai­cai­pu­ro, Ta­ma­na­co, Ca­ya­re, Yo­ra­co and Cha­rai­ma ca­me pre­ci­sely from tho­se springs , to which se­ve­ral tri­bes used to drop by on a re­gu­lar basis in search of health, vi­gor and coura­ge

Newspapers in Spanish

Newspapers from Cuba

© PressReader. All rights reserved.