Ar­te­mi­sa

Guía de Excelencias Cuba - - Summary -

It is one of the new pro­vin­ces crea­ted in 2010, com­pri­sed by 8 mu­ni­ci­pa­li­ties. It has gai­ned great eco­no­mic im­por­tan­ce for being the seat of the Spe­cial De­ve­lop­ment Zo­ne of Ma­riel. It is cha­rac­te­ri­zed by being the seat of the fa­mous Or­chid Bo­ta­ni­cal Gar­den of So­roa, the In­ter­na­tio­nal Ci­ne­ma School of San An­to­nio de los Ba­ños, and for its ru­ral com­mu­ni­ties, exam­ples of the de­ve­lop­ment of sus­tai­na­ble tou­rism in Biosphere Re­ser­ves.

Ca­pi­tal: Ar­te­mi­sa Ex­ten­sion: 4,004.27 squa­re km Mu­ni­ci­pa­li­ties: Ma­riel, Gua­na­jay, Cai­mi­to, Bau­ta, Güi­ra de Me­le­na, Al­quí­zar, Ar­te­mi­sa, Bahía Hon­da, Can­de­la­ria and San Cris­to­bal Demonym: ar­te­mi­se­ño/a Li­mits: It li­mits to the north with the Flo­ri­da Straits and the Gulf of Me­xi­co, to the east with the pro­vin­ces of La Ha­ba­na and Ma­ya­be­que, to the south with the Gulf of Ba­ta­ba­nó, and to the west with the pro­vin­ce of Pi­nar del Río It is ac­ces­sed mainly by land, th­rough the country's road and rail­road network.

Ac­cess: PLA­CES OF IN­TER­EST MIL CUM­BRES

Beau­ti­ful ro­lling hills lo­ca­ted in the mu­ni­ci­pa­li­ties of La Pal­ma, Los Pa­la­cios and Bahia Hon­da. the most sig­ni­fi­cant fea­tu­re of its geo­graphy is the Pan de Gua­jai­bón with 699 m.a.s.l. thus being the hig­hest ele­va­tion of the west of the Is­land. Mil Cum­bres is cha­rac­te­ri­zed by im­por­tant ca­ve sys­tems and nu­me­rous streams, emp­ha­si­zing the many can­yons of Sierra Azul and the ca­ve sys­tem of Ma­mey And Ca­ni­lla, on the nort­hern slo­pe of Pan de Gua­jai­bón.

SIERRA DEL RO­SA­RIO

Lo­ca­ted on the eastern bor­der of the Gua­ni­gua­ni­co moun­tain ran­ge, La Sierra del Ro­sa­rio is the first Biosphere Re­ser­ve of Cu­ba, and re­cei­ved this dis­tin­ction on Fe­bruary 15, 1985. It has over 800 spe­cies of plants with 34% of en­de­mism. Its fau­na pre­sents al­most all the spe­cies that in­ha­bit the Is­land, with the par­ti­cu­lar pre­sen­ce of the zun­zun­ci­to (Me­lli­su­ga he­le­nae) or bee hum­ming­bird, known as the sma­llest bird of the world, the to­co­ro­ro and the wood­pec­ker. In its area you may find So­roa

tou­ris­tic cen­ter and Las Te­rra­zas Com­plex.

SO­ROA

Ca­rre­te­ra de So­roa, km 8, Can­de­la­ria

A na­tu­ral lands­ca­pe of great beauty that at­tracts vi­si­tors from all over the world, it is na­med af­ter the Spa­nish brot­hers Lo­ren­zo and An­to­nio So­roa, who arri­ved in the area in 1856 and pur­cha­sed se­ve­ral cof­fee plan­ta­tions. Lo­ca­ted in the li­mits of the Sierra del Ro­sa­rio, it has se­ve­ral at­trac­tions:

SO­ROA OR­CHID BO­TA­NI­CAL GAR­DEN

It was ope­ned in 1952 by the Ca­na­rian law­yer To­más Fe­li­pe Ca­ma­cho in honor to his wi­fe and daugh­ter. Known for its ex­ten­si­ve co­llec­tion of or­chids, the cons­truc­tion of the gar­den be­gan in the vi­ci­nity of Ran­cho Pi­ni­lla. Exo­tic na­ti­ve spe­ci­mens from Asia, Cen­tral and South Ame­ri­ca star­ted to ex­pand the gar­den, which over the years has co­me to pos­sess mo­re than 20,000 plants re­pre­sen­ting 700 spe­cies, of which 250 are en­de­mic to Cu­ba. To­day it is the lar­gest or­chid farm of the country and one of the most im­por­tant in the world. It al­so has a li­brary spe­cia­li­zed in or­chids.

EL SAL­TO DE SO­ROA (SO­ROA´S WATERFALL)

With a height of 22 m.a.s.l., this waterfall ori­gi­na­ted in Ma­nan­tia­les Ri­ver, is one of the won­ders of Cu­ban geo­graphy, al­so known as the “Rain­bow of Cu­ba.” It des­cends along na­tu­ral cour­ses up to the waterfall pool, whe­re vi­si­tors may ta­ke re­fres­hing baths whi­le en­jo­ying a splen­did pa­no­ra­ma.

“LAS TE­RRA­ZAS” TOU­RIS­TIC COM­PLEX

Ha­ba­na-pi­nar del Río High­way, km 51, Las Te­rra­zas Com­mu­nity, Can­de­la­ria, Tel 048 578578

It is a ru­ral sus­tai­na­ble de­ve­lop­ment pro­ject lo­ca­ted in the Sierra del Ro­sa­rio Biosphere Re­ser­ve, just 60 km west of Ha­va­na. It has a ru­ral settle­ment who­se ar­chi­tec­tu­re is in har­mony with the en­vi­ron­ment.

It of­fers a va­ried tou­rist pro­duct and has se­ve­ral fa­ci­li­ties among which the Ho­tel Mo­ka (Las Te­rra­zas, Can­de­la­ria, Ar­te­mi­sa (Tel 048 578601-02) stands out. He­re, the vi­si­tor may en­joy a re­in­ter­pre­ta­tion of Cu­ban co­lo­nial ar­chi­tec­tu­re

and book spe­cia­li­zed gui­des ser­vi­ces, bird watching tours, hor­se­back ri­ding, moun­tain bi­kes, row­boats and ka­yaks; as well as Ba­ños de San Juan cam­ping si­te (Pho­ne 048 578700), which of­fers rus­tic ca­bins and tents ren­tal.

CANOPY TOUR

A spec­ta­cu­lar at­trac­tion for ad­ven­tu­re lo­vers. From the Ho­tel Mo­ka you may tra­vel at high speed han­ging from a ca­ble stret­ched for se­ve­ral hun­dred me­ters, even abo­ve the la­ke. The Canopy Tour can be boo­ked at the Ho­tel Mo­ka.

PO­LO MONTANEZ’S HOU­SE

A mu­seum de­di­ca­ted to the me­mory of mu­si­cian and lo­cal com­po­ser, Po­lo Mon­ta­ñez, who achie­ved world­wi­de fa­me for the tra­di­tio­nal sty­le and fresh­ness of his com­po­si­tions.

RUINS OF CA­FE­TAL BUE­NA VIS­TA

Lo­ca­ted 2 km east of Ho­tel Mo­ka, it pre­ser­ves the ruins of an old plan­ta­tion cof­fee built in 1801. The main buil­ding is cu­rrently an ele­gant loo­kout res­tau­rant, lo­ca­ted at 240 m high.

SAN JUAN RI­VER BATHS

A na­tu­ral spa lo­ca­ted on the banks of the San Juan Ri­ver. It has na­tu­ral pools with crys­ta­lli­ne wa­ters, so­me of them of con­si­de­ra­ble depth and with mi­ne­ral-me­di­ci­nal wa­ters.

ROU­TES AND TRAILS

The­re are se­ven paths with dif­fe­rent le­vels of com­ple­xity, alt­hough all are sui­ta­ble for the ave­ra­ge tou­rist:

Ca­ña­da del In­fierno Path Las De­li­cias Trail Se­ra­fi­na Trail The Te­rra­ceo The Plea­su­re of Wal­king The Stool. The To­co­ro­ro´s Song

RUINS OF AN­GE­RO­NA OLD COF­FEE PLAN­TA­TION

Ar­te­mi­sa Ca­ya­ja­bos Road, km 5, Ar­te­mi­sa

It is a sam­ple of the splen­dor of cof­fee plan­ta­tions in the wes­tern

re­gion of the Is­land du­ring co­lo­nial ti­mes. Recognized in the first quar­ter of the ni­ne­teenth cen­tury as the most im­por­tant cof­fee plan­ta­tion in Vuel­ta Aba­jo, and the se­cond most im­por­tant in Cu­ba, it was foun­ded by a Ger­man, Cor­ne­lio Sou­chay, and his wi­fe, a Hai­tian, Ur­su­la Lam­bert, who bought the­se lands in 1813. The lo­ve le­gend of the ow­ners of An­ge­ro­na has ins­pi­red se­ve­ral li­te­rary works and the film Roble de Olor.

The old cof­fee plan­ta­tion, de­cla­red a Na­tio­nal Mo­nu­ment in 1989, pre­ser­ves part of the hou­se, the hou­se of the farm ste­ward, the cis­terns sys­tem for the wa­ter sto­ra­ge, the walls for the con­fi­ne­ment of the sla­ves and the loo­kout to­wer. At the en­tran­ce of the ha­cien­da was a sta­tue of the Ro­man God­dess An­ge­ro­na, god­dess of si­len­ce, car­ved in Ca­rra­ra mar­ble, which may now be seen in the Mu­ni­ci­pal Mu­seum of Ar­te­mi­sa.

IN­TER­NA­TIO­NAL SCHOOL OF CI­NE­MA AND TE­LE­VI­SION OF SAN AN­TO­NIO DE LOS BA­ÑOS

Spon­so­red by the New La­tin Ame­ri­can Film Foun­da­tion, the Co­lom­bian wri­ter Ga­briel Gar­cía Már­quez was di­rectly in­vol­ved in its foun­da­tion. It was crea­ted for the trai­ning of film ar­tists and for the de­ve­lop­ment of the film in­dustry in dif­fe­rent coun­tries.

BEA­CHES

Ar­te­mi­sa's coasts are of little re­le­vant as sun and beach des­ti­na­tions, ex­cept for Pla­ya Ba­ra­coa, lo­ca­ted 16 km west of Ha­va­na and very po­pu­lar for na­tio­nal tou­rism in sum­mer, and Pla­ya

Sa­la­do, with rough sands that ma­ke it the ideal seat for a kar­ting track and Pla­ya He­rra­du­ra.

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