Guan­tá­na­mo

Guía de Excelencias Cuba - - Summary -

As the eas­tern­most pro­vin­ce of Cu­ba, it has a va­ried and at­trac­ti­ve tou­rist pro­duct that in­clu­des va­rious ca­te­go­ries such as na­tu­re, ci­ties, pa­tri­mo­nial, and sun and beach tou­rism. Its ca­pi­tal is the na­me­sa­ke city. It was foun­ded in 1797 by French im­mi­grant settlers fleeing the Hai­tian Re­vo­lu­tion, who­se in­fluen­ce can be seen in the ar­chi­tec­tu­re and cof­fee and co­coa plan­ta­tions that cha­rac­te­ri­ze agri­cul­tu­re in the area.

Ca­pi­tal: Guan­tá­na­mo Ex­ten­sion: 6 168 km2

Mu­ni­ci­pa­li­ties: Guan­tá­na­mo, Ba­ra­coa, Ya­te­ras, Imías, Ni­ce­to Pé­rez, Cai­ma­ne­ra, El Sal­va­dor, Mai­sí, Ma­nuel Ta­mes, and San An­to­nio del Sur.

De­nonym: guan­ta­na­me­ro/a Li­mits: it li­mits to the north with the pro­vin­ces of Las Tu­nas and Hol­guín, to the east with the pro­vin­ces of Hol­guín and San­tia­go de Cu­ba, to the south with the pro­vin­ce of San­tia­go de Cu­ba and the Ca­rib­bean Sea, and to the west with the Gol­fo de Gua­ca­na­ya­bo.

Ac­cess: it can be ac­ces­sed by air th­rough Ma­ria­na Gra­ja­les and Gus­ta­vo Ri­zo air­ports, whi­le by land is lin­ked to the rest of the country by the na­tio­nal road network and by the rail sys­tem.

PLA­CES OF IN­TER­EST PAR­QUE MAR­TÍ (PARK)

Ca­lix­to Gar­cía, Pe­dro Pé­rez, Flor Crom­bet and Agui­le­ra streets

It is the main squa­re of the city su­rroun­ded by the main buil­dings of the city.

Igle­sia Pa­rro­quial de San­ta Ca­ta­li­na de Ric­ci (Church)

Agui­le­ra bet­ween Ca­lix­to Gar­cía and Pe­dro Pé­rez streets

It stands out for the beauty of its or­na­ments and for the or­na­men­ta­tion of its cei­lings. This church is con­si­de­red to be the sma­llest in the world.

Pa­la­cio Sal­ci­nes

802-804 Pe­dro Agus­tín and Sil­ve­rio del Pra­do streets

It is one of the most re­mar­ka­ble cons­truc­tions of the His­to­ric Cen­ter of the City. It is na­med af­ter en­gi­neer and ar­chi­tect Jo­sé Leticia de Je­sús Sal­ci­nes, who was in char­ge of its cons­truc­tion bet­ween 1916 and 1918. Its most im­por­tant ele­ment is the scul­ptu­re La Fa­ma that crowns the do­me of the pa­la­ce, ma­de ex­clu­si­vely for this buil­ding by Ita­lian scul­ptor Amé­ri­co J. Chi­ni.

Be­cau­se of its ar­tis­tic and cul­tu­ral im­por­tan­ce and ba­sed on a po­pu­lar sur­vey, this scul­ptu­re be­ca­me the sym­bol of the city sin­ce De­cem­ber 1, 1993.

MU­SEO PRO­VIN­CIAL (MU­SEUM)

804 Mar­tí bet­ween Pra­do and Agui­le­ra streets, Tel 021 32 5872

This buil­ding dates from 1862 and was on­ce a pri­son. It ex­hi­bits pre-co­lum­bian pie­ces and ob­jects re­la­ted to the na­tu­ral history of the re­gion and has in­ter­es­ting co­llec­tions of to­bac­co bands. Among its attributes is a bas-relief that de­picts a map of the US Na­val Ba­se lo­ca­ted on the Bay of Guan­tá­na­mo and the Cu­ban de­fen­si­ve sys­tem. In the lobby, the­re is a Har­ley Da­vid­son mo­tor­bi­ke that be­lon­ged to re­vo­lu­tio­nary Cap­tain As­drú­bal.

IGLE­SIA LA MI­LA­GRO­SA (CHURCH)

812 Pa­seo bet­ween San Gre­go­rio and Cuar­tel streets

With a mar­kedly ra­tio­na­list sty­le, the buil­ding was ma­de with rein­for­ced con­cre­te with a trian­gu­lar roof, re­mi­nis­cent of the “va­ra en tie­rra” sty­le. Its pri­vi­le­ged lo­ca­tion on one of the heights of the city, ma­ke it is a true ur­ban ac­ci­dent. From a slight height, from any point of the city, an­yo­ne can ob­ser­ve its to­wer top­ped with a La­tin cross. Sin­ce 2008, it is the seat of Guan­tá­na­mo-ba­ra­coa bis­ho­pric.

ZOO­LÓ­GI­CO DE PIE­DRA (STONE ZOO)

Fin­ca San Lo­ren­zo, Mu­ni­ci­pa­lity of Ya­te­ras

Built by the self-taught scul­ptor Án­gel Iñi­go Blan­co, it is lo­ca­ted in the mu­ni­ci­pa­lity of Ya­te­ras, 24 km from the city of Guan­tá­na­mo. It re­pre­sents ani­mals car­ved in stone pla­ced in re­crea­tions of their na­tu­ral ha­bi­tats. It was inau­gu­ra­ted on De­cem­ber 21, 1977, and has mo­re than 400 sta­tues ran­ging from hu­ge lions, elep­hants and sna­kes to tiny ani­mals.

PAR­QUE NA­CIO­NAL ALE­JAN­DRO DE HUM­BOLDT (NA­TIO­NAL PARK)

Lo­ca­ted bet­ween the pro­vin­ces of Holguin and Guan­tá­na­mo is one of the most im­por­tant na­tu­ral parks in the Ca­rib­bean. With a high de­gree of con­ser­va­tion, the park has one of the

hig­hest plant den­si­ties and a high per­cen­ta­ge of en­de­mism con­si­de­red among the hig­hest in the world. You can find the­re 2% of the spe­cies of the flo­ra of the pla­net. The park is the fun­da­men­tal nu­cleus of the Re­ser­va de la Bios­fe­ra Cu­chi­llas del Toa, de­cla­red by UNES­CO World He­ri­ta­ge Si­te.

BA­RA­COA

The first of the vi­llas foun­ded by Die­go Ve­láz­quez on Au­gust 15, 1511, is lo­ca­ted bet­ween the Miel ri­ver and the moun­tains. Ini­tially known as the Vi­lla de la Asun­ción de Ba­ra­coa, it was the first po­li­ti­cal ca­pi­tal of the is­land un­til 1515. Its ur­ban cen­ter is Mo­nu­men­to Na­cio­nal (Na­tio­nal Mo­nu­ment.) In its Pa­ro­chial church, they keep the only re­mai­ning Cruz de Pa­rra (Cross of Pa­rra) of the 29 that Co­lum­bus pla­ced af­ter its arri­val to Ame­ri­ca. It is con­si­de­red the ol­dest his­to­ri­cal-re­li­gious re­lic of the en­coun­ter bet­ween the Eu­ro­pean and Ame­ri­can cul­tu­res. Ot­her pla­ces of in­ter­est for na­tu­re tou­rism are the Pa­so de los Ale­ma­nes, and El Yun­que de Ba­ra­coa. It is the only area of the country whe­re you can still ap­pre­cia­te the fea­tu­res of the first in­ha­bi­tants of the is­land, as well as so­me ves­ti­ges of their cul­tu­re.

1 FUER­TE MATACHÍN, MU­SEO 1 MU­NI­CI­PAL (FOR­TRESS AND MU­SEUM)

Mar­tí and Ma­le­cón streets

Lo­ca­ted nort­heast of the city of Ba­ra­coa, on Pun­ta de Es­te­ban and in front of the co­ve of the Miel ri­ver, it was the se­cond for­ti­fi­ca­tion built by ro­yal de­cree. It has been known as Matachín sin­ce

the be­gin­ning of the ni­ne­teenth cen­tury, be­cau­se ac­cor­ding to lo­cal sour­ces each day two cattle we­re sa­cri­fi­ced to feed the Spa­nish sol­diers. It was inau­gu­ra­ted as a Mu­seo Mu­ni­ci­pal (Mu­ni­ci­pal Mu­seum,) on Oc­to­ber 18, 1981 and it has ever sin­ce co­llec­ted the history of the Ciu­dad Pri­ma­da de Cu­ba (Pri­ma­te City of Cu­ba.) Main fea­tu­res are sam­ples of the In­do­cu­ban cul­tu­re, the history of the fa­mous Rus­sian lady (who came and sta­yed he­re) and the co­llec­tions of in­di­ge­nous flo­ra and fau­na of the te­rri­tory such as the poly­mi­tes and the so­le­no­don.

2 CAS­TI­LLO DE SEBORUCO DE SAN­TA BÁR­BA­RA (CASTLE)

Ca­lix­to Gar­cía street, Re­par­to Pa­raí­so

Lo­ca­ted in the nort­heast part of the city, on a mo­re than 100 m.a.s.l. hill, it is the third buil­ding of the de­fen­si­ve sys­tem erec­ted in the vi­lla in the eigh­teenth cen­tury, being the most im­por­tant of all. In the 70's of the twen­tieth cen­tury it was tur­ned in­to a ho­tel that was reha­bi­li­ta­ted in 1992 and which is part of the tou­rist cen­ter of the area. It of­fers a mag­ni­fi­cent view of the city and its su­rroun­dings.

3 FUER­TE LA PUN­TA (FOR­TRESS)

Pun­ta de Bu­ren

It was part of the de­fen­si­ve sys­tem of the city in the eigh­teenth cen­tury and is lo­ca­ted nort­heast of Ba­ra­coa, at Pun­ta de Bu­ren at the en­tran­ce of the port. It now hou­ses a res­tau­rant.

4 PA­RRO­QUIA NUES­TRA SE­ÑO­RA 4 DE LA ASUN­CIÓN DE BA­RA­COA

Pla­za Prin­ci­pal

Lo­ca­ted in front of the main squa­re of the city, it was built in 1807. Des­tro­yed in Au­gust 1833, it was re­pai­red in 1886 and at the be­gin­ning of the twen­tieth cen­tury two la­te­ral to­wers we­re ad­ded in the form of na­rrow py­ra­mids, which do not exist at pre­sent. It trea­su­res the Cruz de Pa­rra (Cross of Pa­rra,) the ol­dest his­to­ri­cal-re­li­gious re­lic of the en­coun­ter bet­ween the old and the new world.

PA­NO­RA­MIC VIEW OF BA­RA­COA

CRUZ DE PA­RRA PLA­CED BY CH­RIS­TOP­HER CO­LUM­BUS IN AME­RI­CA It is the only one that re­mains out of 29 that Co­lum­bus would pla­ce in the New World.

PA­RRO­QUIA NUES­TRA SE­ÑO­RA DE LA ASUN­CIÓN DE BA­RA­COA (CHURCH)

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