Youth (Girls) ed­u­ca­tion vs eco­nomic growth

Sunday Observer - - FEATURES -

Ed­u­ca­tion is a fun­da­men­tal as­pect and req­ui­site for all gov­ern­ments.

It is, there­fore, ev­ery na­tion’s duty to en­sure smooth and avail­able ed­u­ca­tion fa­cil­i­ties to its pop­u­la­tion.

Swazi­land Pop­u­la­tion and Hous­ing Cen­sus ( 2007) and In­ter Cen­sus De­mo­graphic and Hous­ing Sur­vey (2012) found that the lit­er­acy rate is 91 per cent which im­plies that Eswa­tini in as far as ed­u­ca­tion is con­cerned the coun­try is do­ing well.

The Swazi­land Pop­u­la­tion and Hous­ing Cen­sus, (2007 & 2012) also asserted that fe­males are lag­ging be­hind in as far as lit­er­acy is con­cerned.

Ini­tia­tives have put in place to try and di­vert from tra­di­tional be­liefs which put girls sub­or­di­nate to boys and hence see­ing no need for girls

Ini­tia­tives have put in place to try and di­vert from Tra­di­tional be­liefs which puts girls sub­or­di­nate to boys and hence see­ing no need for girls to un­dergo the ed­u­ca­tion fra­ter­nity. As a re­sult of this in­cli­na­tion of girls em­pow­er­ment and ed­u­ca­tion ini­tia­tives Eswa­tini has seen a high pro­por­tion of girls out­shin­ing boys in JC re­sults and even Higher ed­u­ca­tion and which en­hances their em­ploy­a­bil­ity na­ture.

to un­dergo the ed­u­ca­tion fra­ter­nity. As a re­sult of this in­cli­na­tion of girls em­pow­er­ment and ed­u­ca­tion ini­tia­tives Eswa­tini has seen a high pro­por­tion of girls out­shin­ing boys in JC re­sults and even Higher ed­u­ca­tion and which en­hances their em­ploy­a­bil­ity na­ture. In gen­er­ally, there are more young girls aged 25-35 years who are oc­cu­py­ing high pro­file po­si­tions in all sec­tors of the econ­omy whether pri­vate or pub­lic in the world and Eswa­tini is no ex­cep­tion.

These girls through ac­quir­ing ed­u­ca­tion get to be able to make sound and proper de­ci­sions in­clud­ing de­ci­sions con­cern­ing whom to marry, how to marry and they make de­ci­sions on TFR as to how many chil­dren they want and whom to have chil­dren with. with

Also ed­u­ca­tion of the girl child in­creases pro­duc­tion ca­pac­ity as more and more of the girls get to be swal­lowed by the pub­lic and pri­vate sec­tor. Ed­u­ca­tion plays a vi­tal role in hu­man de­vel­op­ment, which is one of the key de­ter­mi­nants of sus­tain­able so­cio-eco­nomic de­vel­op­ment

Ed­u­ca­tion in­for­ma­tion is use­ful to pol­icy mak­ers for for­mu­lat­ing pub­lic poli­cies such as poverty re­duc­tion, gen­der eq­uity and health poli­cies. Fur­ther­more, girl’s ed­u­ca­tion (em­pow­er­ment) has helped most girls free from dis­eases such as HIV/AIDS, STIs and other dis­eases. As they are now able to use pro­tec­tive mea­sures when en­gag­ing into sex­ual in­ter­course and they tend to avoid risky be­hav­iours and through ed­u­ca­tion young girls are able to find pos­si­ble means of fam­ily plan­ning tech­niques which helps in re­duc­ing TFR, poverty.

Poverty is re­duced as girls now also have jobs which makes them able to sus­tain them­selves even when the men have left them with the chil­dren now un­like in the past girls are able to find good pay­ing jobs which re­duces the high de­pen­dency ra­tio and now a high ma­jor­ity of the girls are in­de­pen­dent as a re­sult of ed­u­ca­tion.

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