‘Chil­dren Born With Lower IQ Due to Cli­mate Change’

Stud­ies on the sub­ject found ev­i­dence the change is due to stress hor­mones from the mother cross­ing into the pla­centa.

Fiji Sun - - World News - New­shub

Chil­dren who ex­pe­ri­ence ex­treme weather events be­fore they’re born have lower IQs than those that don’t, a new re­port sug­gests.

The re­port from Global Health Al­liance Aus­tralia laid bare the

im­pacts cli­mate change is hav­ing on health, AAP re­ports.

It looked at more than 100 pieces of re­search and pol­icy anal­y­sis to work out how en­vi­ron­men­tal con­di­tions are af­fect­ing peo­ple’s health.

Global Health Al­liance Aus­tralia ex­ec­u­tive di­rec­tor Misha Cole­man was shocked by fact the re­search sug­gested an ef­fect on chil­dren’s IQ.

Stud­ies on the sub­ject found ev­i­dence the change is due to stress hor­mones from the mother cross­ing into the pla­centa.

One study found spe­cific ef­fects in chil­dren that went through the 2011 Bris­bane floods, which was part of a clus­ter of floods in Queens­land from 2010 to 2011.

“It’s been es­ti­mated that those kids lost about 14 IQ points be­cause of the stress their mothers went through,” Cole­man told AAP. The study also re­vealed higher tem­per­a­tures and green­house gasses are lead­ing to in­creased asthma at­tacks and al­ler­gies. Cole­man said some­times it could be hard for peo­ple to un­der­stand the broader im­pli­ca­tions of cli­mate change on health. “Dur­ing the Black Satur­day fires for ex­am­ple, peo­ple know about how many peo­ple died in the fires,” she told AAP.

“But over those days, we had like 43 de­gree tem­per­a­tures, there were an ad­di­tional 374 deaths from heat­stroke, be­cause there is a re­la­tion­ship with heart fail­ure and other sorts of un­der­ly­ing dis­eases that are mas­sively ex­ac­er­bated.”

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