UNESCO HER­ITAGE TOUR

Charming Bordeaux - - THE UNMISSABLES -

It has been 10 years since an ur­ban perime­ter of 1810 hectares in cen­tral Bor­deaux re­ceived recog­ni­tion by UNESCO as a World Her­itage site. The Tourist Of­fice of­fers routes around the city to help you dis­cover the am­bi­ence and the main monuments of Bor­deaux at your own pace.

1 MON­U­MENT AUX GIRONDINS

A trib­ute to the in­hab­i­tants of Gironde lost dur­ing the French Rev­o­lu­tion, ‘Lib­erty Break­ing its Chains’ stands proud at the top of the 43m col­umn (1895-1901).

2 MAI­SON GOBINEAU

Bor­deaux’s own ver­sion of the ‘Flat­iron Build­ing’ which houses the CIVB head­quar­ters (Bor­deaux Wine Multi-dis­ci­plinary Coun­cil) as well as their wine bar, which is a lo­cal in­sti­tu­tion (1788).

3 GRAND-THÉÂTRE

A mas­ter­piece of Euro­pean ar­chi­tec­ture, the stair of which in­spired the ar­chi­tect re­spon­si­ble for the Opera Garnier in Paris. Fronted by a columned por­tico with twelve stone stat­ues (nine muses ac­com­pa­nied by Minerva, Venus, Juno).

4 ÉGLISE NOTRE-DAME

Con­structed by the Ja­cobins, the church is typ­i­cal of baroque ed­i­fices of the Counter-ref­or­ma­tion. Its parvis has been the set of nu­mer­ous pe­riod-drama films.

5 COUR MABLY

The clois­ter of a for­mer Do­mini­can con­vent, to­day it is the Re­gional Cham­ber of Ac­counts and a con­cert and ex­hi­bi­tion venue.

6 PORTE DIJEAUX

A gate­way into the city from the West since the Ro­man era, it was re­built by Voisin be­tween 1748 and 1753. Un­til the Rev­o­lu­tion, it was called Dauphin’s Gate in hon­our of the French Dauphin, the fu­ture King Louis XVI.

7 PALAIS RO­HAN

This build­ing was orig­i­nally the Arch­bishop’s Palace in 1784, but in 1800 it be­came the Gironde Pre­fec­ture, then an im­pe­rial palace and royal res­i­dence, un­til fi­nally be­com­ing the city hall in 1837.

8 CATHÉDRALE SAINT-AN­DRÉ & TOUR PEY-BERLAND

This Gothic-style cathe­dral hosted two royal mar­riages. The first be­tween Eleanor of Aquitaine and the fu­ture Louis VII and the sec­ond be­tween Anne of Aus­tria and Louis XIII. The Pey Berland Tower, a bell tower built in the 15th cen­tury sep­a­rately from the cathe­dral, of­fers a unique view of the city (50m).

9 MUSÉE D’AQUITAINE

A mu­seum re­trac­ing the his­tory of Aquitaine and Bor­deaux, from pre­his­tory to the present.

10 GROSSE CLOCHE

A his­toric town bel­fry and the only re­mains of the old de­fen­sive gate of the 13th cen­tury. The weather vane on top rep­re­sents a golden lion, sym­bol of the Kings of Eng­land. Cast in 1775, the bell weighs 7,800 kg.

11 PLACE FERNAND-LAFARGUE

The for­mer ‘old mar­ket place’ (1155), where the pil­lory was once in­stalled. To­day along with Rue Saint James con­sti­tutes one of the hippest places in Bor­deaux.

12 PORTE CAILHAU

A for­mer de­fen­sive gate (1493-1496) ded­i­cated to King Charles VIII of France, vic­tor of the Bat­tle of Fornovo (Italy).

13 ÉGLISE SAINT-PIERRE

Built be­tween the 14th and 15th cen­turies on the site of an old Gallo-ro­man port. The square and the paved streets that branch off make up Bor­deaux’s old town.

14 PLACE DU PARLEMENT

The most Ital­ian of the squares in the city, cre­ated in 1754 by de­cree of Bailiff Tourny. In the cen­tre stands a foun­tain by Louis Gar­ros (1865).

15 PLACE DE LA BOURSE

This prod­uct of the Age of En­light­en­ment is the most com­pa­ra­ble city square to Ver­sailles. Pre­vi­ously called the Royal Square, along with the ‘Stock Mar­ket Build­ing’ it be­came the place where trade prices were set in the 18th cen­tury. The left wing is home to Bor­deaux Pat­ri­moine Mon­dial, a dis­cov­ery cen­tre that in­vites the pub­lic to dis­cover the city’s his­tory through­out the cen­turies. In the cen­tre of the square lies The Foun­tain of the Three Graces.

16 MIROIR D’EAU

A key fea­ture of the Garonne wa­ter­front re­de­vel­op­ment project, the big­gest wa­ter mir­ror in the world (3,450 m² and a 300 m3 un­der­ground tank) has be­come an em­blem and a fa­vorite place for strolling.

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