L'étiquette (English)

LOOSE PANTS

(Baggy or not)

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Give this feature a hard pass if you’re big into slim-fit pants.

There’s obviously no precise technical definition of what constitute­s loose pants, so we’re mixing it up a bit here with different cuts and leg widths – wide legs, super-baggy, flared or just slightly looser styles. The thing they all have in common: they’re not tight around the thighs. ■Here, we’re looking at a very generous cut that seems inspired by those suit pants in fabrics like Sportex or tergal that you find in thrift stores. You might not think so, but that’s a compliment. ■If you want to push that skater look to the limit, how about layering a short-sleeve T-shirt over a long-sleeve one? We can’t think of anything better.

T-shirt, ’90s. Pants, MAISON MARGIELA. Sneakers, CONVERSE.

This image and this style are a good opportunit­y to point out that narrow chinos aren’t really chinos. It’s nonsense when they start to crease at the knees. Chinos should be generously cut. At the very least, they should have a straight leg. If you wear them with dress shoes, just make sure they’re short enough not to break at the ankle, so they fall in the right way. ■It’s perfectly possible to wear a chino/ cardigan/loafers combo without looking like a granddad. Here, what’s crucial is the bulk of the cardigan – along with the design on the T-shirt.

T-shirt, ’80s. Chinos, ’50s. Cardigan, LACOSTE. Loafers, SEBAGO.

Flared pants are nothing to be afraid of, but make sure you don’t go overboard. These have a subtle flared leg that creates a ’70s vibe without making you look like a clown. ■A short, zipped jacket with no ribbing at the waist is an easy-to-wear summer staple. Just slip it on over a crewneck T-shirt. ■Yet another pair of horsebit loafers? This is one style that’s here to stay. Proof that it’s not just a passing trend.

T-shirt, ’80s. Jacket and pants, SURFIN ESTATE. Loafers, GUCCI. Sunglasses, RAY-BAN. Watch, ROLEX. Belt, HARPO.

Since we’re still right in the middle of it, here’s your latest – and laziest yet – work-from-home attire, consisting of pajama bottoms, hoodie and slippers. ■Pairing poplin pajama pants with a Wu-Tang hoodie is, of course, equally satisfying aesthetica­lly and ideologica­lly. Dressing like this is the unmistakab­le sign that you’re a well-rounded man.

T-shirt, LE MINOR. Hoodie,’90s. Pajama pants, HERMÈS. Slippers, CHARVET.

Button-down shirts work with everything, so there’s no reason why they wouldn’t go with an old pair of wrecked 501s. Quite the contrary: here, a shirt smartly counterbal­ances the very juvenile aspect of this outfit and the cap. ■Overdyed oxford shirts in bright colors like yellow, green and red are great for summer.

Shirt, RALPH LAUREN. Jeans, ’80s, LEVI’S. Cap, ’90s, OCEAN PACIFIC. Sneakers, ’80s, ADIDAS.

These pants are the ultimate vintage find. They were made in the ’60s by Abercrombi­e & Fitch and sold with a matching jacket. Their colors rendered the hunters who wore them highly visible to other hunters, while animals wouldn’t notice them as they couldn’t distinguis­h the colors. This pair costs a fortune on the vintage market, which doesn’t really matter since they’re absolutely impossible to find. ■Well done if you spotted that Johnny Depp wore the jacket that matches these pants in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Hunter S. Thompson, who wrote the book the film is based on, loaned it to the actor. ■While you can’t wear this particular pair of pants, there’s a lesson here: with a plain polo shirt and loafers, you can afford to take risks with your legwear.

Pants, ’60s. ABERCROMBI­E & FITCH. Polo, UNIQLO. Watch, ROLEX. Loafers, CROCKETT & JONES.

Here’s a look that says “larger-than -life”: baggy denim cargo pants paired with an oversize college sweatshirt. This is certainly one option for hanging-out wear. ■Important detail: unlike dress shoes, casual footwear – like these deck shoes with textured rubber soles – can handle pants that break into folds at the ankle.

Sweatshirt, ’80s, CHAMPION. T-shirt, UNIQLO. Carpenter pants, ’50s. Shoes, SEBAGO.

Yet another loose pair of chinos, yet another pair of loafers… They make an unbeatable summer combo, especially if the pants have a sharp crease in them, and you wear the shoes without socks. ■This vintage baseball shirt and its emerald-green color are especially beautiful, but bear in mind that a plain white T-shirt would do the trick just as well here.

Baseball jersey, ’50s. Chinos, RALPH LAUREN. Loafers, ALDEN.

We won’t explain yet again the history of the Canadian tuxedo, which was the original name for double denim. We’ll just restate that it can work very well, as long as the denim is good, and there’s a contrast in their washes or cuts. ■Here, the cuts are different: fitted top, baggy bottoms. ■The belt is a traditiona­l Navajo concho belt in silver.

T-shirt, UNIQLO. Jeans and trucker jacket, ’70s, LEVI’S. Belt, HARPO. Shoes, CLARKS. Sunglasses, ’50s from CULTURE FRAMES.

With flowing pants like these, you need a top that holds everything together with a bit of structure. This cotton Aran sweater does that really well. ■Are you still wondering what an Aran sweater is? It’s a type of knitwear that came from Ireland – Galway Bay or, more precisely, the westerly Aran Islands – more than a hundred years ago. Traditiona­lly in off-white wool with cable patterns, it was originally knitted by womenfolk for their fishermen husbands. ■Yes, this does work with Moroccan babouches.

Sweater, LOUIS VUITTON. Pants, MAISON MARGIELA. Slippers, from Morocco.

Here, baggy white pants fall loosely over a pair of Clarks Wallabees. This footwear option could equally well be swapped for a pair of rubber-soled deck shoes. ■ The top is a parka. Why ? Because you slip it on over your head. ■ Obviously, vinyl isn’t the easiest material to wear, but it can work very well for a short garment like this.

T-shirt, LOEWE. Anorak, LACOSTE. Pants, LES INDIENNES DE NÎMES from DETOUJOURS.COM. Shoes, PADMORE & BARNES from BEIGE HABILLEUR.

Another loose pair of chinos, another outfit that’s as easy as ABC. ■ Here, the tank top underneath is crucial. It means the shirt can be left almost unbuttoned, and its relaxed feel counterbal­ances the rigidity of the chinos. ■ Is it okay to go sockless in your Wallabees? Of course!

Overshirt, HAVERSACK from BEIGE HABILLEUR. Tank top, MOULIN NEUF. Chinos, ’50s. Shoes, PADMORE & BARNES from BEIGE HABILLEUR.

With loose-fitting jeans, a weatherpro­of parka is always a good idea. It becomes an excellent idea when it is buttoned right to the top, as it is here.

■In the 1960s, two British mountainee­rs founded Berghaus, the first European brand to sell Gore-Tex parkas. In the early’90s, they became the go-to apparel for soccer fans, who had a penchant for high-tech, expensive, colorful garments. And, of course, there are some wonderful images of Liam Gallagher sporting a Berghaus parka. Buttoned right to the top, it goes without saying.

Parka, BERGHAUS. Jeans, ’80s, LEVI’S. Shoes, PADMORE & BARNES from BEIGE HABILLEUR.

The green stripe of the Coca-Cola delivery driver’s pants is a perfect match for these sneakers, with their green accents. And it’s not just a question of color. The proportion­s are crucial here: worn with more refined shoes, these pants would lose their elegance. ■ Everyone should have a yellow jacket in their wardrobe. Waterproof or not, it’s a classic.

Jacket, HOMECORE. T-shirt, LE MINOR. Pants, ’50s. Sneakers, AIMÉ LEON DORE & NEW BALANCE.

These pants, with patch pockets on the sides, are called bush pants. Originally designed to be worn in the woods, they also work well in an urban setting – especially when the cut is as sharp as it is here. ■The authentic cricket sweater is an integral part of the attire (known as “cricket whites”) that players wear on the field. Traditiona­lly, a cricket, sweater goes with a shirt, but our recommenda­tion is to slip it on over a white T-shirt or even over a bare chest. ■Leather sandals? Yes, sir.

Sweater, N.E. BLAKE & CO. Pants, ’70s, LEVI’S. Sandals, PARABOOT.

Bib overalls? No, don’t run away… At least, not just yet. They are extremely comfortabl­e (if a bit time-consuming at toilet breaks) and can be darn stylish – just check out the old photos of Eminem and Tupac. You get the picture. ■In French, overalls are called salopettes, which has some pretty dirty connotatio­ns. That’s because the word is derived from salir, in the sense of “to make dirty” (from the same root as “soiled” in English). Since overalls were designed as workwear for manual laborers, they were literally made to be dirtied.

T-shirt, CAMBER from BEIGE HABILLEUR. Bib overall, ’70s J.C. PENNEY. Bucket hat, POLO RALPH LAUREN. Shoes, PADMORE & BARNES from BEIGE HABILLEUR. Bracelet, DARY’S.

This outfit pairs jeans, which have been customized by hand with double knees, with a loose Dizzy Gillespie T-shirt and an especially baggy mohair cardigan. It might not be the best outfit for a formal job interview, but it really rocks as chilling-out wear. ■Never forget: fitted cardigans are to be avoided at all costs – they’re just so ugly. Also steer clear of the cardgan-andshirt combo, a particular­ly boring fashion crime.

T-shirt, ’90s. Cardigan, CELINE HOMME by HEDI SLIMANE. Jeans, ’90s LEVI’S. Sneakers, SPRING COURT.

All vintage pieces from this series are from LE VIF.

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