Phe­nom­e­non

Milk Magazine (English) - - CONTENTS - Text: Mar­gaux Stein­myller

From daugh­ters to moth­ers

Parentally ap­proved chil­drenswear brands such as Bobo Choses, Bon­ton, Buho, Emile et Ida, Louise Misha, Mo­toreta and Tiny­cot­tons are lit­er­ally grow­ing up and launch­ing their lines for women.

At the last Play­time Paris chil­dren’s fash­ion trade fair, 25 out of the 530 brands on dis­play un­veiled their adult col­lec­tion. More than just a fash­ion fad, it’s “a new era” ac­cord­ing to Chan­tal Dan­guil­laume, Play­time’s sales di­rec­tor. Del­phine Papiernik, founder of Emile et Ida, took the leap last year: “It wasn’t planned, but we gave in to pres­sure from con­sumers!” she joked. In each case, in fact, the de­mand comes from cus­tomers who re­ally like the care­fully crafted, graphic uni­verse of th­ese new pro­tag­o­nists in chil­dren’s fash­ion, whose prod­ucts are any­thing but pow­der pink. While some women slip into age 14 or 16 sized am­ply-cut gar­ments, oth­ers snap up kids’ off­beat, fun ac­ces­sories. As a re­sult, in­stead of merely fol­low­ing fash­ion dic­tates, th­ese “con­sum’actresses” are mak­ing them­selves heard. Bon­ton, for ex­am­ple, has launched “Maxi Me”, a range of twenty or so chil­dren’s “best-sell­ers” for moth­ers. They have the same de­sign and come in iden­ti­cal colours, prints and fabrics. For Irène Co­hen, the con­cept store’s founder and di­rec­tor,

Ex­pand­ing into adult sizes is a nat­u­ral devel­op­ment that “follows the cy­cle of life” for those cus­tomers whose chil­dren are grow­ing up so fast. True, it rep­re­sents a fi­nan­cial in­vest­ment for th­ese brands, but guar­an­tees a clien­tele that will re­main loyal longer, since adults sizes do not change so quickly.

the walls have come tum­bling down. Who still buys their sweat­shirts only in sports shops or their favourite fra­grance in per­fume stores? Be­sides, chil­drenswear has another ma­jor as­set – qual­ity. The par­ents of the lat­est gen­er­a­tion find tech­no­log­i­cal in­no­va­tion, eco-friendly choices and norms very ap­peal­ing. Keen on pretty ma­te­ri­als and con­cerned about where prod­ucts are made, Émile et Ida afi­ciona­dos were look­ing for this type of qual­ity. For Chan­tal Dan­guil­laume, ex­pand­ing into adult sizes is a nat­u­ral devel­op­ment that “follows the cy­cle of life” for those cus­tomers whose chil­dren are grow­ing up so fast. True, it rep­re­sents a fi­nan­cial in­vest­ment for th­ese brands (re­cruit­ment in the tech­ni­cal field, store con­ver­sion), but guar­an­tees a clien­tele that will re­main loyal longer, since their sizes do not change so quickly. And as the boom in the life­style sec­tor (sta­tionery, cos­met­ics, bed­ding, food, table­ware, home dec­o­ra­tion) has been no­tice­able in brands like Mini Ro­dini, Mathilde Ca­banas and Ketiketa, ac­ces­sories are also very likely to branch into adult style.

Lastly, de­sign­ers know that nos­tal­gia is the right chord to strike in 2018: “com­fort clothes” are not meant to copy chil­dren’s wardrobes, but rather to be­to­ken the art of liv­ing as a fam­ily.

Búho SS 2018

Bobo Choses SS 2017

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