Ger­many: Over 4,000year-old skele­ton dis­cov­ered

In a "rare and ex­cit­ing find," ar­chae­ol­o­gists in Bran­den­burg un­cov­ered the skele­ton of a woman who died thou­sands of years ago. Re­searchers want to know how she died and why she was buried in an un­usual po­si­tion.

Deutsche Welle (English edition) - - Front Page -

In a "rare and ex­cit­ing find," ar­chae­ol­o­gists in Bran­den­burg un­cov­ered the skele­ton of a woman who died thou­sands of years ago. Re­searchers want to know how she died and why she was buried in an un­usual po­si­tion.

The skele­ton was dis­cov­ered dur­ing ex­ca­va­tion work for a wind tur­bine in the district of Uck­er­mark, lo­cated around 102 kilo­me­ters out­side of Ber­lin.

The woman is be­lieved to have been buried be­tween 2,200 and 2,500 B.C., Christof Krauskopf from Bran­den­burg's state of­fice for mon­u­ment preser­va­tion told Ger­man news agency epd.

He added that the un­usual way that the woman was buried makes the makes the find of "a high sci­en­tific sig­nif­i­cance."

'Never made a find like this be­fore'

Ar­chae­ol­o­gists Philipp Roskoschin­ski and Christoph Rze­gotta, who made the dis­cov­ery, said that the skele­ton was found posed in a crouched po­si­tion in a pit near a set­tle­ment, not in a ceme­tery.

Roskoschin­ski told epd that the dis­cov­ery was a "rare and ex­cit­ing find." The woman was laid to rest on her right side with her legs and arms pulled in, with her head po­si­tioned to the east with her gaze point­ing north.

Read more: Who lived near Pöm­melte, the 'Ger­man Stone­henge'?

"I've never made a find like this be­fore," Roskoschin­ski, who owns the ar­chae­o­log­i­cal firm Ar­chaeros, told the Tagesspieg­el news­pa­per.

He and his col­league be­lieve that this in­di­cates the woman was pur­pose­fully po­si­tioned this way and was not sim­ply put in the grave.

Re­searchers are now car­ry­ing out tests to get a bet­ter idea of how old the skele­ton is as well as how the woman died.

"Un­for­tu­nately, there were no other finds in the grave that could tell us more about the woman's life," Roskoschin­ski told Tagesspieg­el news­pa­per. "But the site was lov­ingly sur­rounded by field­stones."

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