Quee­nie Rosita Law

Founder of Pro­duc­tion Q art and de­sign stu­dio

Prestige Hong Kong - 40 under 40 - - Contents -

“I see my­self as a sum of three parts – creative, en­tre­pre­neur­ial and busi­ness. There are a lot of con­cepts I have in mind that I keep push­ing the bound­aries of and ex­plor­ing”

With quiet dig­nity, Quee­nie Rosita Law opened the creative stu­dio Pro­duc­tion Q in 2014 and since then has be­come a gen­tle force to be reck­oned with in the art world. When she last spoke to us, her clients were as var­ied as Joyce Gallery Paris, K11 and Roger Vivier, which com­mis­sioned cus­tomised art from her and her mul­ti­fac­eted com­pany.

We caught up with the globe-trot­ting Law so she could tell us what keeps her busy — and per­pet­u­ally col­lect­ing pass­port stamps. “For my stu­dio, Pro­duc­tion Q, we con­tinue to de­velop the idea of art and de­sign be­ing in­cor­po­rated within daily liv­ing spa­ces. This year we did a col­lab­o­ra­tion with Bo­con­cept [store] and Cobo House [restau­rant], where I hand painted on Bo­con­cept’s sig­na­ture lounge chair. The idea was to cre­ate a chair that will be show­cased in the mid­dle of the din­ing room as an art piece.”

Af­ter wrap­ping up a project with The Mur­ray ear­lier this year (in which she de­signed women’s scarves and men’s pocket squares), she’s ex­pand­ing into broader art con­sul­ta­tions where her com­pany not only cre­ates works of art but sources mul­ti­ple art pieces — sculp­tures, prints and pat­terns — for large-scale projects. And then there’s her pas­sion project in Bu­dapest.

“We’re cre­at­ing ex­hi­bi­tion spa­ces in a beau­ti­ful, four-storey, 19th-cen­tury villa in the heart of the city,” she says. “The space will be ded­i­cated to di­a­logue and dis­cov­ery. We’ll host cu­rated shows and artist col­lab­o­ra­tions, and of­fer an im­mer­sive artist-res­i­dency pro­gramme with young tal­ents from Cen­tral and Eastern Europe and Asia to pro­mote cross­cul­tural ex­changes and in­spire cre­ativ­ity. I see how tal­ents strug­gle with lack of space to ex­plore — hence this ini­tia­tive.”

With so many projects in mid-air, she’s had a year to re­flect on what she’s do­ing and where she’s go­ing. “I see my­self as a sum of three parts — creative, en­tre­pre­neur­ial and busi­ness. There are a lot of con­cepts I have in mind that I keep push­ing the bound­aries of and ex­plor­ing. I like to come up with in­ter­est­ing ways of pre­sent­ing an orig­i­nal idea to the pub­lic.

“As an en­tre­pre­neur, I like to start things from scratch. One of the favourite parts of my job is to gather in­for­ma­tion and ideas, and see that come to fruition, from con­cept to tan­gi­ble ob­ject, like the City Book, and now the Bu­dapest project. My busi­ness role is just sim­ply the fact you can­not es­cape the need to make money, so that you can keep do­ing what you love do­ing.”

Be­fore zoom­ing off to the air­port yet again, she be­moans nei­ther the con­stant jet lag nor her try­ing sched­ule. “The best as­pect of run­ning my busi­ness is con­trol­ling my own path and the free­dom of ex­plor­ing. I re­ally love what I do. I never see my work as work — I see it as a part of my be­ing, body and soul, and it’s within me.”

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