Time to save tiger

Pro­tect the Na­tional An­i­mal from dy­ing.

Alive - - Contents - ■ by C.K. Subra­ma­niam

World Tiger Day (July 29), in­sti­tuted in 2010 aims to gal­vanise public sup­port in the wake of the dwin­dling pop­u­la­tion of the big cat. It is no­table that 70 per­cent of the World's Tiger pop­u­la­tion is in In­dia.

Other coun­tries with the large pop­u­la­tion are Rus­sia, In­done­sia, Malaysia, and Nepal. In­ter­na­tional Tiger's day saw the dwin­dling pop­u­la­tion of the species with only 3948 tigers left in the world. So I would like to recre­ate about the aware­ness of Tiger pop­u­la­tion in In­dia. It is in­deed a sorry state of af­fairs that a num­ber of tigers are dy­ing ev­ery year, thus re­duc­ing the Tiger pop­u­la­tion con­sid­er­ably.

In a re­cent study, it was re­vealed that nearly 93 tigers have died in Gu­jarat in the last 3 years, ac­count­ing for ap­prox­i­mately 31 tigers in a year. The tiger pop­u­la­tion had de­pleted to 1411 in 2007. It in­creased to 1706 in 2011. And it rose to 2226 ac­cord­ing to the last na­tional tiger cen­sus in 2014. The death rate is very high and at this rate, the tiger pop­u­la­tion will go down. Out of the 93 deaths, 85 tigers died nat­u­rally and 8 tigers were killed by poach­ers. It is time to pro­tect Tigers from dy­ing. There are 50 tiger re­serves in In­dia hav­ing started out with nine when Project Tiger was launched in the year 1983.

To curb poach­ing

To check poach­ing, the Gu­jarat Gov­ern­ment has de­cided to keep a check on ve­hi­cles en­ter­ing the Gir Re­serve and a close watch on ac­tiv­i­ties and move­ment of labour­ers en­ter­ing from other states. Some of the Tigers fell in open wells and ar­range­ments is made to cover 9000 odd wells. For­est pa­trolling has been in­ten­si­fied to cur­tail poach­ing. Nearly 50 cubs died dur­ing the rel­e­vant pe­riod and 25 Fe­male

Tigers died com­par­ing 18 male Tigers. Save Tiger cam­paign should start in full earnest or else we can see ex­tinc­tion tigers to­tally dur­ing the next cen­tury. Con­stant GPS mon­i­tor­ing of the tiger cubs till they are adults will also en­sure they sur­vive long. Also if the

Save Tiger cam­paign is worked in full earnest, then ex­tinc­tion rate of tigers would re­duce.

We have Kanha Na­tional Park which in­stills nos­tal­gia be­cause the land­scape here is straight out of Rud­yard Ki­pling`s Jun­gle Book. The

most fa­mous one is the Jim Cor­bett Na­tional Park, Ut­tarak­hand which pro­vides a key dif­fer­en­tia­tor would be the knowl­edge­able guide who would lead the tiger spot­ting ex­pe­di­tion. Pench in Ma­ha­rash­tra- MP bor­der is a home to the su­per­mom ti­gress In Band­hav­garh Na­tional Park in MP we can plan a stay en­twined with na­ture com­bined with a visit to the hills and the fort and a sa­fari with a wildlife ex­pert and en­thu­si­ast is in the off­ing.

Re­mem­ber­ing Ran­tham­bore Na­tional Park in Ra­jasthan, we can stay on an or­ganic farm stay near Ran­tham­bore and go tiger sight­ing. As close to na­ture as it gets, best of the best is the Bandipur Tiger Re­serve in Kar­nataka where you can stay in a jun­gle lodge here and go on a jeep sa­fari. Keep that cam­era handy for a quick snap of the big cat in the wilder­ness. No­table among other re­serve is Na­gar­hole Tiger Re­serve in Kar­nataka and be part of tiger pop­u­la­tion and stay in the jun­gle and hear the growls and prowls of the wild as you sleep. To add to the tiger pop­u­la­tion we have Kazi­ranga Tiger Re­serve in As­sam.

Tholpetty Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary

Turn­ing to wildlife sanc­tu­ary Tholpetty Wildlife Sanc­tu­ary in Ker­ala's Wayanad is a nat­u­ral beauty in God's own coun­try. Kar­nataka leads the list with 289 tigers fol­lowed by Jim Cor­bett Tiger Re­serve with 215 in their ranks to boost our tiger pop­u­la­tion. Re­al­is­ing the de­creas­ing num­ber of tigers in the coun­try, Project Tiger is an In­dian Gov­ern­ment ini­tia­tive launched in 1983 by the Gov­ern­ment of In­dia dur­ing Prime Min­is­ter Indira Gandhi’s ten­ure limit is­sues that lead to the re­duc­tion of tiger habi­tats. The project aims at en­sur­ing that pop­u­la­tion of tigers is main­tained. Some of the main habi­tats of In­dia that fall un­der Project Tiger are the North East con­ser­va­tion unit, Sun­der­bans con­ser­va­tion unit, Sariska con­ser­va­tion unit and the Western Ghats con­ser­va­tion unit among var­i­ous oth­ers. Let’s unite in our ef­forts to save the royal species for fu­ture by pro­tect­ing their habi­tats and curb­ing il­le­gal trade.

Some of the Tigers fell in open wells and ar­range­ments is made to cover 9000 odd wells. For­est pa­trolling has been in­ten­si­fied to cur­tail poach­ing. Nearly 50 cubs died dur­ing the rel­e­vant pe­riod and 25 Fe­male Tigers died com­par­ing 18 male Tigers. Save Tiger cam­paign should start in full earnest or else we can see ex­tinc­tion tigers to­tally dur­ing the next cen­tury. Con­stant GPS mon­i­tor­ing of the tiger cubs till they are adults will also en­sure they sur­vive long. Also if the Save Tiger cam­paign is worked in full earnest, then ex­tinc­tion rate of tigers would re­duce.

Nearly 93 tigers have died in Gu­jarat in the last three years.

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