Swati Pasari: Man­i­fest­ing thoughts through colours

“Art has the power to heal emo­tions”

Alive - - Contents - ■ by Su­man Ba­j­pai

Ay­oung and very tal­ented artist Swati Pasari’s paint­ings project a kind of eter­nity. Her in­ner thoughts man­i­fest through colours, tex­tures, and hues, that help in not only pro­vid­ing her an in­ner peace but also spread­ing pos­i­tiv­ity to all those who comes in con­tact with her. She ex­presses a strong in­ner spir­i­tu­al­ity through her art form. She never plans about a paint­ing, and nei­ther does she know where a paint­ing will take her. When she starts paint­ing, she en­ters into a new di­men­sion. And then her jour­ney to reach her in­ner soul and find peace and spir­i­tu­al­ity be­gins which fill a kind of unique­ness in her work.

She did her school­ing from Mod­ern High School in Cal­cutta (Kolkata). She stud­ied for a year in Aus­tralia, do­ing busi­ness. She com­pleted her Bach­e­lor’s de­gree from Cal­cutta Univer­sity in Com­merce.

Her for­mal artis­tic jour­ney started in 2007, but very soon she has be­come fa­mous in the art world. Swati has ex­hib­ited in gal­leries across In­dia which in­cludes prom­i­nent names like In­dia Habi­tat Cen­tre New Delhi, State Art Gallery - Hy­der­abad, Academy of Fine Arts - Kolkata , Emami Chisel Art Gallery –Kolkata, Dhoomi­mal Art Gallery New Delhi , Sa­mara Art Gallery - Ahmed­abad , Sublime Gal­le­ria -Ban­ga­lore and in in­ter­na­tional des­ti­na­tions like Lon­don, Dubai, Tokyo, Hous­ton among oth­ers.

Break­ing the stereo­type of be­ing a ‘young’ artist and fight­ing with a con­crete mind­set, Swati has cre­ated a solid path for her­self in the midst of known and con­tem­po­rary artists. She says it doesn’t mat­ter for me for how long you are into this field, but so­ci­ety and big names in the field, al­ways looks you then with sus­pi­cious eyes. But I feel that you can­not es­ti­mate tal­ent with the num­ber of years of work­ing or ex­pe­ri­ence. Al­though, this mind­set is chang­ing rapidly and in In­dia also, like abroad, peo­ple are now more con­cerned about the art­work in­stead of other no­tions sur­round­ing it.

She is more into semi ab­stract art and sculp­tures. Her paint­ings are done on

can­vas with acrylic colours and the sculp­tures are made of fi­bre-glass.

Ex­cerpts from a talk with the artist:

You be­long to a busi­ness fam­ily then how did the idea of paint­ing gen­er­ated in you?

Art had been my call­ing since long – ever since I was a child I wanted to do some­thing which was a cre­ative and art was a nat­u­ral choice. How­ever, I went to study abroad and came back to join fam­ily busi­ness when one day I de­cided art was what I was pas­sion­ate about and it was a full time vo­ca­tion for me. So, what was a hobby be­came a call­ing and pro­fes­sion.

What feel­ings do you un­dergo when you face a blank can­vas and are about to start work on it?

The joy of cre­ation is what de­fines it – I feel my emo­tions are about to be trans­lated into real life fig­ures and art. For an artist this is an eu­reka mo­ment – the art is al­ready there in the mind and as you start giv­ing shape to it you get that im­mense sense of self sat­is­fac­tion.

You prac­tice a kind of still­ness ev­ery day to work. This of­ten means co­coon­ing your­self away to sketch, read, or sim­ply think, but work, and for you it is a rit­ual not to be missed, what you have to say on this?

When I am do­ing art – I am on a dif­fer­ent zone and nor­mal day to day ac­tiv­i­ties do not de­ter me. Work is pas­sion for me and no amount of dis­trac­tion can take me away from it. I be­lieve this is a must do for any artist – you need to come in terms with your thoughts and or­ga­nize it be­fore you start trans­lat­ing it.

Your most of sculp­tures are face­less? What thought plays be­hind this?

What I por­tray is the emo­tion be­hind it. I do not think of it as a re­li­gious no­tion but as an ab­stract form to de­pict the di­vine soul and the emo­tions which I seek to cap­ture in it. To me di­vine is an emo­tion – a feel­ing which tran­scends the bound­ary of iden­tity.

Some­where you had send that you en­ter a dif­fer­ent di­men­sion when you paint and you do not know what the paint­ing will be­come till it’s done. So how does you know then if your paint­ing is com­plete or not?

It is the in­ner call­ing and urge to con­tinue which will drive me on if the paint­ing is not com­plete. As I said it all be­gins in the mind first and slowly but steadily we move on to cap­ture the form – as long as the com­plete form does not take place the mind of the artist is not at peace.

Your paint­ings talk about im­mor­tal­ity, time­less­ness, about find­ing in­ner still­ness and peace. Are these your life goals? Have you dis­cov­ered paint­ing as one of the ways to at­tain in­ner peace? It sounds lit­tle philo­soph­i­cal?

Yes they are my life goals – to find di­vin­ity and peace in my day to day life.

Paint­ing to me is my con­nec­tion to di­vine – I deep delve within me to bring out nuggets of peace and do soul search­ing to find the de­sired form.

What are the ideas you con­vey through your colour palate? Do colours play a ma­jor role in defin­ing art?

For me life is a cel­e­bra­tion and colours are tools to cel­e­brate the joy of life and tran­scend it bound­aries. My art is de­fined by colours – in fact quite a few times they are a riot of colours. Each of them are di­verse yet at the end they sync and bring out the com­mu­ni­ca­tion that they are all ways to cel­e­brate the joy and mirth that is so much an in­te­gral part of life. Re­search shows, that visual per­cep­tion in­flu­ences the hu­man mind more deeply than any other form of per­cep­tion. For in­stance, we get soaked in the beauty of a beau­ti­ful land­scape when we see one and sim­i­larly our hearts sink in grief when we see an im­age of the des­ti­tute in Africa. The colours and shapes we see have a deep im­pact on our mood and psy­chol­ogy.

You feel that art has the power to heal emo­tions. Can you throw some light on this?

My art is driven with a de­sire to bring out all that I have within my­self, while pre­serv­ing the spir­i­tual beauty of na­ture and all of cre­ation. I be­lieve that art has the power to heal emo­tions and thoughts, and that is phi­los­o­phy which un­der­lies all my cre­ations. My at­tempt is to cap­ture those el­e­ments of our ex­is­tence which are eter­nal, change­less and hence in­fi­nite. To cap­ture the in­fi­nite us­ing fi­nite tools is next to im­pos­si­ble, yet I try.

Do you work on gut feel­ing or it is pre­planned?

It is ab­so­lutely driven by gut. I soul search and come across a vi­sion which is then trans­lated in can­vas/sculp­ture.

How do you de­cide whether your piece of art work has com­pleted?

It is not easy to de­cide and was of­ten dif­fi­cult to as­cer­tain, but when you look into a piece of art, you feel a sense of com­plete­ness and that feel­ing spreads to your in­ner be­ing. That is how I un­der­stand that my jour­ney has been com­pleted and then I fin­ish my paint­ing.

My art is de­fined by colours – in fact quite a few times they are a riot of colours. Each of them are di­verse yet at the end they sync and bring out the com­mu­ni­ca­tion that they are all ways to cel­e­brate the joy and mirth that is so much an in­te­gral part of life. Re­search shows, that visual per­cep­tion in­flu­ences the hu­man mind more deeply than any other form of per­cep­tion. For in­stance, we get soaked in the beauty of a beau­ti­ful land­scape when we see one and sim­i­larly our hearts sink in grief when we see an im­age of the des­ti­tute in Africa.

Your paint­ings and sculp­tures are dec­o­ra­tive and spir­i­tual, but do they con­nect with to­day’s ex­is­tence in any­way?

Yes the theme is eter­nal joy and cel­e­bra­tion of life – they are con­nected with to­day’s ex­is­tence.

Do you paint for art’s sake or com­mer­cially?

For art’s sake def­i­nitely – to me art is a means to search the di­vin­ity within and ex­press and share it to the out­side world.

Do you think that the ex­tra cre­den­tials you have as a busi­ness stu­dent will help you sell your art bet­ter?

It is help­ful, but I feel that it’s the cu­ra­tor and the art gallery’s job to mar­ket the prod­uct. So, I don’t want to use my en­ergy a lot into mar­ket­ing my work. That would be the gallery’s pre­rog­a­tive. I per­son­ally would want to fo­cus on my cre­ation.

What are the strong­est in­flu­ences on your art de­vel­op­ment through the years?

Evo­lu­tion of my­self as a spir­i­tual be­ing is what had in­flu­enced my art de­vel­op­ment through the years. I deep delve within me to bring out in­ner peace and do soul search­ing to find the de­sired form.

What are the chal­lenges you face while paint­ing and giv­ing ex­pres­sions to your thoughts?

I don’t even con­sider those as chal­lenges be­cause if I’m not happy at any stage, I’ll restart even if it’s al­most done. I’m ready to bear the cost but not the feel­ing of un­hap­pi­ness. Nei­ther my paint­ings are re­li­gious, which peo­ple of­ten think see­ing the paint­ings of Gane­sha, Bud­dha and Kr­ishna. In re­al­ity, they de­note pos­i­tiv­ity, peace and luck that is the rea­son they in­spire me. I also write shlokas on them that are meant to en­cour­age the buyer to do ev­ery­thing in life as an of­fer­ing to God. The process of mak­ing one piece is first mak­ing the sculp­ture in clay then mould­ing then fi­bre cast­ing. The dif­fi­cult part is mak­ing the POP and then ready­ing the mould. This en­tire process takes a month-anda-half.

How do you see con­tem­po­rary In­dian art grow­ing?

At a fan­tas­tic pace which is phe­nom­e­nal – we see new artists cel­e­brat­ing di­verse form to come ev­ery day and es­tab­lish their place in the world.

What achieve­ments in your art ca­reer are you most proud of?

I have won nu­mer­ous awards and all these are proud mo­ments for me. More than that there are sev­eral em­i­nent peo­ple who have ap­plauded their work and this marks a cel­e­bra­tion for me.

In your view how you have evolved over the years as an artist?

My works have be­come more de­fined as far as spir­i­tu­al­ity is con­cerned. I have found a clear path in sync with my life’s pur­pose which sets me dis­tinct as an artist.

You have held many solo and group ex­hi­bi­tions, what kind of prepa­ra­tions do you make be­fore an ex­hi­bi­tion?

I am just pre­pared as far as my art is con­cerned – rest is all des­tinies and I sim­ply go with the flow. I be­lieve in show­cas­ing my best and so be­fore each ex­hi­bi­tion I pre­pare to show­case work which is apt for the artist.

What are your fu­ture plans?

To do many more in­ter­na­tional shows and win awards. To es­tab­lish my­self as an artist with a dis­tinct iden­tity in times to come.

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