Mak­ing Ev­ery Skill Count!

A re­port on the var­i­ous poli­cies and schemes that are ben­e­fit­ing the com­mon worker of the ap­parel in­dus­try

Apparel - - Contents -

Rapid glob­al­i­sa­tion is push­ing open the bound­aries of the tex­tile in­dus­try as a whole. From de­vel­op­ment in weav­ing and pro­duc­tion tech­niques to chang­ing the way in which labour is be­ing treated, ev­ery sec­tor of the in­dus­try is ex­pe­ri­enc­ing a se­ri­ous over­haul. A lot of changes and ad­vance­ment are be­ing brought about at each seg­ment so as to push the en­tire value chain to­wards growth. Skill de­vel­op­ment is one of the most prom­i­nent as­pects among all the big and small changes tak­ing place in favour of the in­dus­try. Nur­tur­ing the skills of tex­tile work­ers is a very im­por­tant re­quire­ment, as hon­ing the right skills will al­low more tex­tile labour­ers to find their ap­pro­pri­ate and niche-spe­cific jobs. Un­like ear­lier times when work­ers en­joyed a low sta­tus, the com­ing to power of the Modi gov­ern­ment has iden­ti­fied them as the strength of the coun­try. This is why it brought into ac­tion the Skill In­dia pol­icy.

Un­der this pol­icy, the Gov­ern­ment lists out a life cy­cle of train­ing and train­ing cen­tre ap­point­ment. Firstly, the Train­ing Part­ner Reg­is­tra­tion & Train­ing

Cen­tre Cre­ation is un­der­taken, then ac­cred­i­ta­tion and af­fil­i­a­tion of the cen­tre hap­pens, which is closely mon­i­tored on a reg­u­lar ba­sis. The train­ing cen­tre is only given a re­newal li­cence if its per­for­mance is seen to match gov­ern­ment ex­pec­ta­tions. Skill gen­er­a­tion and im­part­ing the right train­ing is just one as­pect of the Skill In­dia ini­tia­tive. Reg­u­la­tion of the right jobs to this skilled work­force is the next and most im­por­tant as­pect of skill de­vel­op­ment.

FU­TURE OF TEX­TILE WORK­ERS IN TERMS OF SKILL DE­VEL­OP­MENT

Tex­tile Sec­tor Skill Coun­cil (TSC), a non-profit or­gan­i­sa­tion work­ing un­der the aegis of the Min­istry of Skill De­vel­op­ment & En­trepreneur­ship (MSDE), has been set up to ben­e­fit the In­dian tex­tile in­dus­try. Un­der the cur­rent Chair­man­ship of Shri T Ra­jku­mar, TSC con­ducted a sen­si­ti­sa­tion pro­gramme through the ac­tive sup­port of SIMA for the hand­loom and pow­er­loom in­dus­tries and the small and medium size tex­tile mills on De­cem­ber 8, 2018. The pro­gramme pri­mar­ily fo­cuses on the var­i­ous ac­tiv­i­ties of TSC and ways by which the small and medium units, namely hand­looms and pow­er­looms, knit­ting and pro­cess­ing, OE spin­ners and small-scale spin­ning units, and mills can ben­e­fit out of the skill de­vel­op­ment schemes.

Shri T Ra­jku­mar briefed the par­tic­i­pants about the TSC and re­quested them to take ad­van­tage

SKILL GEN­ER­A­TION AND IM­PART­ING THE RIGHT TRAIN­ING IS JUST ONE AS­PECT OF THE SKILL IN­DIA INI­TIA­TIVE.

HAND­LOOM WEAVERS ARE DI­RECTLY BEN­E­FIT­TED UN­DER THE RPL SCHEME.

of the schemes. Dr J V Rao, CEO, TSC, ap­prised the au­di­ence of the schemes and the var­i­ous tan­gi­ble ben­e­fits avail­able to the ben­e­fi­cia­ries.

To re­solve the prob­lems be­ing faced by hand­loom weavers and to con­trib­ute to their so­cio-eco­nomic de­vel­op­ment, TSC has been ac­tively work­ing to recog­nise and cer­tify the skills of weavers across the coun­try. Tamil Nadu alone con­sti­tutes 20 per cent of the 82,000 recog­nised and cer­ti­fied weavers un­der the Recog­ni­tion of Prior Learn­ing (RPL) scheme. Un­der this scheme, hand­loom weavers are ed­u­cated about dig­i­tal learn­ing, mo­bile bank­ing, im­por­tance of e-com­merce, and health and hy­giene in the work­ing area. Hand­loom weavers are di­rectly ben­e­fit­ted un­der the RPL scheme by means of: a) Recog­ni­tion and sta­tus in the so­ci­ety through GoI recog­nised cer­tifi­cates, b) Per­sonal ac­ci­dent in­surance (in­clud­ing death and per­ma­nent dis­abil­ity) cover of R2 lakh for three years from the date of cer­tifi­cate by New In­dia As­sur­ance Co. Ltd, c) El­i­gi­bil­ity to get loans un­der var­i­ous schemes such as Prad­han Mantri Mu­dra Yo­jana, d) R500/- one-time com­pen­sa­tion for their wage loss, e) Free ac­cess to DigiBu­nai CAD soft­ware, and f) Ca­reer path – pro­vi­sion to get 10th grade cer­tifi­cate (Hand­loom) from the Na­tional In­sti­tute of Open School­ing (NIOS) for school dropouts.

To help the tex­tile mill sec­tor, es­pe­cially in Tamil Nadu, to meet its man­power re­quire­ment, TSC has been in­stru­men­tal in get­ting the train­ing tar­gets re­leased to the tex­tile mills un­der short du­ra­tion pro­grammes of up to two months. Di­rect man­power engaged so far across In­dia to train un­der the Short-Term Train­ing (STT) is 42,760 and out of these, 65 per cent were for Tamil Nadu tex­tile mills.

TSC is also help­ing the Tamil Nadu mills to meet their huge re­quire­ment of skilled work­force through job me­las. So far, TSC has chan­nelised about 30 tex­tile in­dus­tries in more than 20 Roz­gar (job) me­las. As re­sult of the ini­tia­tives, more than 5,000 can­di­dates were se­lected by the in­dus­tries through the job me­las. TSC has di­rectly engaged with states such as Mad­hya Pradesh, Ut­tar Pradesh and As­sam to con­duct tex­tile-ex­clu­sive job me­las and has re­ceived a huge re­sponse from the tex­tile mills of Tamil Nadu.

THE NEED FOR SKILLED LABOUR

Back in 2012, it was es­ti­mated that the In­dian tex­tile in­dus­try would cre­ate job op­por­tu­ni­ties for more than 10 mil­lion work­ers. This was be­cause the in­dus­try had been un­der the radar of ap­pre­ci­a­tion at var­i­ous global lev­els since years. The sce­nario that be­gan in 2012 has not changed much; the dy­nam­ics of course have. Since the start of the Skill In­dia ini­tia­tive, more and more skilled labour­ers have been ap­pointed at var­i­ous lev­els of the tex­tile in­dus­try. How­ever, that has only ful­filled five per cent of the va­cant po­si­tions. There are more op­por­tu­ni­ties and va­can­cies still left within the in­dus­try that re­mains to ab­sorb a big­ger work­force.

The de­vel­op­ment of the tex­tile in­dus­try brought about a greater de­vel­op­ment within the an­cil­lary sec­tor of the in­dus­try that con­nected the dots for the en­tire value chain. This in re­turn is in­dica­tive of eco­nomic growth. How­ever, growth, es­pe­cially that of the tex­tile in­dus­try, is not pos­si­ble un­less the labour­ers are given a back­bone of skill de­vel­op­ment. Ma­jor­ity of the tex­tile work­ers are well-versed with hand­loom skills. But to face growth, the pow­er­loom sec­tor needs to progress too and that’s where skill comes as a fill-in-the­blank. So, in or­der to mod­ernise the in­dus­try so that ev­ery sec­tor equiv­o­cally re­sponds to the global re­quire­ments, ev­ery strata of the in­dus­try needs to utilise the skill de­vel­op­ment move­ment ini­ti­ated by the Modi gov­ern­ment.

TSC IS ALSO HELP­ING THE TAMIL NADU MILLS TO MEET THEIR HUGE RE­QUIRE­MENT OF SKILLED WORK­FORCE THROUGH JOB ME­LAS.

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