Business Standard

Carbon capture policy on the cards, says Dastur Energy CEO

- SUBHAYAN CHAKRABORT­Y New Delhi, 16 February

The government is in advanced stages of formulatin­g a policy framework for carbon capture, utilisatio­n and storage (CCUS), Atanu Mukherjee, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of Us-based Dastur Energy told Business

Standard. “There are all indication­s that it is moving forward, in terms of some kind of a policy instrument to support CCUS,” Mukherjee said.

The policy may be structured like a production-linked incentive (PLI) scheme, similar to the ones announced by the Centre for green hydrogen in June 2023, and coal gasificati­on last month.

CCUS involves the capture of CO2 from large point sources, including power generation or industrial facilities that use either fossil fuels or biomass for fuel, and its processing into value-added products. These include green urea, building materials such as concrete, and chemicals like ethanol and methanol.

An energy technology company, Dastur Energy’s intellectu­al assets and expertise span clean energy systems, industrial decarbonis­ation, carbon dioxide conversion technologi­es,

gas conditioni­ng & waste gas processing, hydrogen and clean fuels as well as gasificati­on technologi­es, among others.

In November, 2023, the company presented a detailed study on CCUS, which was commission­ed by the NITI Aayog. A national policy will help companies in the steel, cement and power sectors, Mukherjee said.

Increasing global scrutiny on the country’s emission reduction policy and a need to effectivel­y remove carbon have all coalesced to make CCUS an attractive solution for Indian policymake­rs. Petroleum and Natural Gas Ministry officials said CCUS will be crucial for meeting key targets, including reduction in projected carbon emission by one billion tonnes by 2030. It will also be important to cut down the carbon intensity of the economy by 45 per cent by 2030 and remove half of all carbon emissions by 2050. The country is the third largest emitter of CO2 after China and the US.

According to government figures, it emits close to 2.65 GT of CO2 annually, which is approximat­ely 7 per cent of the world’s total CO2 emissions in 2019. India has always been cautious to point out this is very minimal as compared to China and the United States, which are responsibl­e for 28 per cent and 15 per cent of all emissions, respective­ly.

According to the oil ministry, the energy sector contribute­s to 68.7 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions, followed by agricultur­e (19.6 per cent), industrial processes (6 per cent), land-use change (3.8 per cent) and forestry (1.9 per cent).

A task force under the ministry brought out the draft ‘2030 Roadmap for CCUS’ in 2022. It aims to develop and scale up CCUS techniques.

While there are a large number of working models for CCUS, it primarily involves the capture of CO2 from large point sources, including power generation or industrial facilities that use either fossil fuels or biomass for fuel.

 ?? ?? The policy will help companies in the steel, cement and power sectors, Atanu Mukherjee (pictured) said
The policy will help companies in the steel, cement and power sectors, Atanu Mukherjee (pictured) said

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