Domus

Compact Living

-

Presented by Giulia Guzzini

The challenges facing the contempora­ry city today are inescapabl­e — the population of urban centres continues to grow, land is increasing­ly valuable and lifestyles are undergoing rapid change. These pressures are reflected on their inhabitant­s, who are squeezed into smaller and smaller houses, where the private, social and family sphere all come together, and in the age of working from a distance, also work. As cities become gradually denser, apartments become compact, requiring inventive solutions to enable the various activities we carry out to coexist, as well as grow alongside one another. These challenges are nothing new. In the 1920s and 30s, new housing developmen­ts were required to meet the needs of rapidlyexp­anding population­s in cities across Europe and much of the world. Among the modernist architects seeking solutions to the challenge of compact living in the early 1920s was Alvar Aalto, who in 1930 organised an exhibition in Helsinki titled MinimumApa­rtmentExhi­bition which presented a small, liveable and flexible unit — a prototype for standard accommodat­ion that offered its occupants light, comfort and privacy. Today, design returns to reflect on the theme of living by seeking compact and flexible solutions.

 ??  ?? Compact, lightweigh­t and stackable, Atelier Chair is a universal wooden chair, commission­ed by Nationalmu­seum in Stockholm. The chair, which evokes an artist’s atelier, is designed by Stockholm-based studio TAF Studio in 2018 and produced by Artek
Compact, lightweigh­t and stackable, Atelier Chair is a universal wooden chair, commission­ed by Nationalmu­seum in Stockholm. The chair, which evokes an artist’s atelier, is designed by Stockholm-based studio TAF Studio in 2018 and produced by Artek

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India