2020 STREET TRIPLE RS

The best mid­dle-weight naked now gets a bit more oomph

Evo India - - CONTENTS - WORDS by AB­HISHEK WAIRAGADE PHO­TOG­RA­PHY by KING­DOM CRE­ATIVE

Rid­ing the mid­dle-weight Tri­umph at Cir­cuito de Carta­gena in Spain

IT’S MY THIRD TRIP TO SPAIN IN A SPAN OF ONE year and I’ve al­ready got­ten ac­quainted with all that the serene coun­try­side has to of­fer. The food, the smell, the ter­rain and even the tar­mac isn’t re­ally very dif­fer­ent from what we come across back here in In­dia. Ad­di­tion­ally, the ma­chine in ques­tion is quite fa­mil­iar as well. The RS has been among our favourite mid-weight nakeds since its launch a cou­ple of years ago, hav­ing won the in-house award as well. With the 2020 up­date, Tri­umph has taken the ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ ap­proach with the Street Triple RS. The im­ple­men­ta­tion of Euro 5 regs man­dated Tri­umph in­cor­po­rate changes to the ex­haust sys­tem any­way but they’ve gone a step fur­ther and given the RS a fresh set of clothes as well. But does that take the RS fur­ther ahead of the com­pe­ti­tion or have the oth­ers caught up al­ready?

Up­dates?

The 765cc, liq­uid-cooled triple has been re­worked with in­puts from the Moto2 en­gine team, which means, de­spite meet­ing the norms, the power fig­ure and weight haven’t changed at all. Thanks to the new ex­haust cam and in­take duct, the torque is up by 2Nm at 79Nm with a 9 per cent boost in the mid-range. The ex­haust has been tweaked with im­proved in-flow and out-flow and the pipe looks ex­quis­ite thanks to a car­bon­fi­bre tip. It also gets a bi-di­rec­tional quick­shifter with auto blip­per. In terms of de­sign up­dates, the big­gest change is the men­ac­ing ‘eye­brow’ clus­ter which seems in­spired from the Tiger. The tank re­mains the same but other body pan­els have been smoothened out for a well­rounded, mus­cu­lar look. There’s also a seat cowl which adds to the sleek de­sign. Among other up­dates, there’s the sec­ond

THE RS HAS BEEN AMONG OUR FAVOURITE MID­DLE-WEIGHT NAKEDS SINCE ITS LAUNCH A COU­PLE OF YEARS AGO

gen TFT clus­ter that comes with four themes and sev­eral colour op­tions to choose from. There’s also an in­te­grated GoPro con­trol sys­tem along with nav­i­ga­tion.

On the road

As afore­men­tioned, the dry weight re­mains the same at 166kg, which ob­vi­ously equates to the best power-to-weight ra­tio in this class. And to test its po­ten­tial, we not only rode the RS on the bumpy B-roads around Mur­cia but also at the bril­liant Carta­gena race track.

On the streets, the triple mo­tor feels even more ea­ger thanks to the lin­ear power and torque de­liv­ery. The tractabil­ity has im­proved vastly and the short first and sec­ond ra­tios make it easy to ride at low speeds. The third gear can go down all the way to 15kmph and then take you to speeds over 100kmph ef­fort­lessly, mak­ing the RS ex­tremely com­fort­able to ride on roads. How­ever, the rid­ing po­si­tion is ag­gres­sive (for a naked) and the ground clear­ance is low as well. More on that later, when it comes to In­dia in Jan­uary 2020. But the real fun be­gins on track where the Triple RS re­ally shines and shows its true po­ten­tial.

The en­gine loves to be revved and revved hard! The triple mo­tor comes alive es­pe­cially after 6000rpm, go­ing all the way to a howl­ing 12,750rpm and the quick­shifter al­lows you

to switch cogs ef­fort­lessly. How­ever, the bikes we rode were pro­to­types and some journos faced is­sues with the blip­per. But you sim­ply for­get about it after show­ing it a few sets of cor­ners. The USP is still the han­dling though. With fully ad­justable Showa Big Pis­ton Forks at the front and pre­mium Oh­lins monoshock at the rear, the RS is a hoot in cor­ners. It’s so sure­footed and clin­i­cal that you’ll be able to at­tain men­tal speeds through the cor­ners. What aids the rid­ing even fur­ther are those bril­liant Brembo M50s. Tri­umph has pro­vided MCS ra­tio- and span-ad­justable levers to al­low you to ad­just the sharp­ness mak­ing it ex­tremely po­tent on track. Last but not the least, a spe­cial men­tion to the third-gen Pirelli Su­per­corsa SPs. The soft-com­pound Pirellis are the best road-le­gal tyres I have tested ever and are su­per sticky. Mind you, the Street Triple RS is the only mid­dleweight naked which wears those boots, thus adding to its pre­mium kit.

Still the king?

Yes and no. The ad­di­tional grunt makes it ex­tremely tractable and al­lows for in­sane corner exit speeds. The sus­pen­sion setup still re­mains a bench­mark in its class and so do the bril­liant Brembo M50s cou­pled with the Pirelli Su­per­corsa SPs. How­ever, I also rode some­thing sim­i­lar and orange a cou­ple of weeks be­fore the RS and that re­ally blew me away. If you’re a track junkie, the RS is still the best bet for you. But if you want some­thing more prac­ti­cal which will also save you more than cou­ple of lakh ru­pees, I think the 790 Duke makes for a more bal­anced mid-weight hooli­gan. The com­pe­ti­tion has clearly moved then. ⌧

THE STREET TRIPLE RS IS SO SURE­FOOTED AND CLIN­I­CAL THAT YOU’LL BE ABLE TO AT­TAIN MEN­TAL SPEEDS THROUGH THE COR­NERS

TRI­UMPH STREET TRIPLE RS En­gine 765cc, In-line triple, liq­uid-cooled Trans­mis­sion 6-speed Power 121bhp @ 11,750rpm Torque 79Nm @ 9350rpm Weight 166kg (dry) Price `11.5 lakh (es­ti­mated)

Fac­ing page, bot­tom: 765cc mo­tor has been tweaked by the Moto2 en­gine team; sec­ond-gen clus­ter not re­ally in­tu­itive. Left: The rear end, with the seat cowl, seems clearly in­spired by the Day­tona 765

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