Sex Capers

Sex is good medicine. Here’s how…

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

Know how sex helps heal

Most of us are quicker to hit the gym be­fore hit­ting the sheets when it comes to tak­ing care of our­selves. Be­lieve it or not, huff­ing and puff­ing your way through a hot, sweat-in­duc­ing sex ses­sion may be far more ben­e­fi­cial to your over­all health than the time you spend on the tread­mill. As re­search con­firms time and again, good sex in a healthy, sta­ble, monog­a­mous re­la­tion­ship can only bet­ter our phys­i­cal, men­tal, emo­tional and spir­i­tual well­be­ing. Sex, in this con­text, of­fers us tons of ben­e­fits, most of which aren’t touted nearly enough. Here are just a few ben­e­fits:

Weight loss

For­get tor­tur­ing your­self with the lat­est fad diet or hours on the el­lip­ti­cal ma­chine when you can burn about 200 calo­ries in 30 min­utes of sex! Love­mak­ing lends it­self to im­proved strength, flex­i­bil­ity, mus­cle tone and car­dio­vas­cu­lar con­di­tion­ing. Plus, there’s some­thing su­per sexy about get­ting to sleep with your very own ‘per­sonal trainer’.

Pain re­lief

Forgo pop­ping a painkiller. Sex has been shown to of­fer mi­graine and men­strual cramp re­lief, as well as al­le­vi­ate chronic back pain, thanks to the en­dor­phins and cor­ti­cos­teroids re­leased dur­ing sex­ual arousal and or­gasm.

Stress man­age­ment

Sex in­creases the lev­els of oxy­tocin, stim­u­lat­ing feel­ings of warmth and re­lax­ation. What bet­ter way to un­wind from a tough day than shar­ing its most cli­mac­tic moment with your spe­cial some­one?

Im­mune booster

Stop spend­ing late nights at the of­fice. Sex wards off colds and the flu. This is be­cause phago­cytes, which are part of the im­mune sys­tem that at­tack and kill com­mon cold germs, in­crease dur­ing sex and dou­ble af­ter or­gasm.

Bet­ter heart health

A lit­tle bit of heart and soul in the sack should be part of ev­ery doc­tor’s or­ders when it comes to car­dio­vas­cu­lar care. Stud­ies have also shown that men

Love­mak­ing lends it­self to im­proved strength, flex­i­bil­ity, mus­cle tone and car­dio­vas­cu­lar con­di­tion­ing. Plus, there’s some­thing su­per sexy about get­ting to sleep with your very own ‘per­sonal trainer’.

who have sex at least twice a week have a lower risk of hav­ing a heart at­tack. And for the women, in­creased lev­els of es­tro­gen are re­leased dur­ing sex, which also help fight heart disease.

In­creased self-es­teem and in­ti­macy

When sex is con­sis­tent and in­volves mu­tual plea­sure, it can in­crease bond­ing since the surge in oxy­tocin at or­gasm stim­u­lates feel­ings of af­fec­tion, in­ti­macy and close­ness. Is it any won­der that good sex­ual en­ergy in a pos­i­tive re­la­tion­ship can make you feel bet­ter about your­self, your part­ner, and life in gen­eral?

Sleep en­hance­ment

There’s no need to count sheep when sex, in­clud­ing mas­tur­ba­tion, helps in­som­nia. Plus, mak­ing love sure beats toss­ing and turn­ing your way to zzzz’s.

A bet­ter, younger look­ing you

Sex keeps you look­ing and feel­ing younger, and ac­cord­ing to some re­search, may lead to shiny hair, a glow­ing com­plex­ion and bright eyes. This is be­cause it in­creases the youth-pro­mot­ing hor­mone DHEA (de­hy­droepian dro stone ). And feel­ing more at­trac­tive charges your sex life even more.

Mood lifter

Sex re­leases plea­sure-in­duc­ing en­dor­phins

Sex keeps you look­ing and feel­ing younger, and ac­cord­ing to some re­search, may lead to shiny hair, a glow­ing com­plex­ion and bright eyes.

dur­ing arousal and cli­max that can re­lieve de­pres­sion and anx­i­ety, and in­crease vi­brancy.

Longevity

There is a sig­nif­i­cant re­la­tion­ship be­tween fre­quency of or­gasm and risk of death, espe­cially with men. Men who or­gasm two times a week have a 50 % lower chance of mor­tal­ity than those who cli­max one time per month. The bonus: Liv­ing longer also gives you and your honey the op­por­tu­nity for even more lovin’!

De­creased risk of breast cancer

One study of women who had never given birth found that an in­creased fre­quency of sex­ual in­ter­course was cor­re­lated with a de­crease in the in­ci­dence of breast cancer.

Re­lieves hang­over

Al­though it can’t cure the dam­age you’ve al­ready done to your body - and to your liver in par­tic­u­lar - sex can help you re­cover from a nasty hang­over, per­haps even more so than a greasy, fried-up break­fast. Sex re­leases en­dor­phins and oxy­tocin, which stim­u­late your mus­cles and im­prove your mood. Af­ter­ward, you’ll no doubt feel like tak­ing a nice, long sleep too, which will also help with the hang­over.

Re­pro­duc­tive health ben­e­fits

Ac­cord­ing to at least one study, sex ap­pears to de­crease a man’s risk of prostate cancer, and the preven­tion of en­dometrio­sis in women. It also pro­motes fer­til­ity in women by reg­u­lat­ing men­strual pat­terns. While ex­er­cise on a reg­u­lar ba­sis is im­por­tant to your health, sex can do so much more for you and your re­la­tion­ship. And it’s a work­out plan you’re like­lier to stick to.

Sex can help you re­cover from a nasty hang­over, per­haps even more so than a greasy, fried-up break­fast.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.