Sex Capers

Bet­ter bond­ing tips in the bed­room

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

The bed­room is a sa­cred space for a re­la­tion­ship, but it’s about more than just a good mat­tress, tran­quil wall colour and com­fort­able sheets. You need also to keep con­sis­tent bed­time habits with your part­ner for your re­la­tion­ship to flour­ish and mar­riage to sus­tain. Here are some bed­time rules and rit­u­als that happy cou­ples swear by:

THEY GO TO BED AT THE SAME TIME

Go­ing to bed to­gether is a great op­por­tu­nity for cou­ples to con­nect and talk about their days’ events. Many cou­ples don’t see each other all day long and have a habit of go­ing to bed at dif­fer­ent times. Ac­cord­ing to re­search, happy cou­ples brush their teeth to­gether and go to bed at the same time. It helps them main­tain the warmth and in­ti­macy of their re­la­tion­ship. If one of you goes to sleep much ear­lier than the other, try to still make some time around when­ever the ear­lier per­son goes to bed – even if you need to get up af­ter they’ve gone to sleep.

THEY HAVE A HEARTTO-HEART

Ded­i­cate some time - an hour or even a few min­utes - be­fore go­ing to sleep to gen­er­ally have a light-hearted chat. Ex­press pos­i­tive feel­ings to­wards your part­ner; don’t weigh each other down with prob­lems about of­fice/ fam­ily mem­bers/ fi­nances. Pil­low talk con­nects cou­ples emo­tion­ally, helps you for­get about prob­lems, and makes you feel re­laxed. This will help end the day on a pos­i­tive note and make you feel bet­ter. It also has a pos­i­tive in­flu­ence on your over­all mood.

THEY DON’T FIGHT

Try not to get in­volved in heated ar­gu­ments be­fore go­ing to sleep. Fight­ing in bed never helps solve a prob­lem. On top of that, it’s harder for both of you to fall asleep, and you’ll also feel de­pressed the next day.

THEY POWER DOWN PHONES AND TURN OFF THE TV

It’s bet­ter for your health,

and for your re­la­tion­ship. With­out dig­i­tal dis­trac­tions, you’re leav­ing more of an op­por­tu­nity to start mean­ing­ful con­ver­sa­tions or, well, what­ever else two adults might do in bed to­gether. So­cial me­dia de­pen­dency sup­presses the re­lease of oxy­tocin in your body. This hor­mone is re­spon­si­ble for emo­tional in­ti­macy and bond­ing. Put away the phone/ lap­top when your part­ner needs your un­di­vided at­ten­tion, es­pe­cially in the bed­room. Don’t be in­ti­mate, hold­ing your phone, more than you hold your part­ner.

THEY FOR­GET ABOUT WORK

Try to for­get about work, and stop check­ing your work email when you are in bed. It’s so much bet­ter to spend that time to­gether and to have some rest so you can be pro­duc­tive at work the next day.

THEY DON’T SHARE A PET

Bed­time is an in­ti­mate hour. Be vig­i­lant about your pets but make sure your pets have an­other com­fort­able place to sleep be­sides your bed.

THEY CUD­DLE & KISS

Phys­i­cal touch is so im­por­tant to a good re­la­tion­ship, and cud­dling in bed is like a short­cut to in­ti­macy. Ac­cord­ing to re­search, part­ners who sleep less than an inch apart are more likely to be happy in their re­la­tion­ship.

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