Weight Loss

Nutritionist Neha Sa­haya’s bat­tles body sham­ing

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

Men­tal and phys­i­cal well­be­ing are a cru­cial part of our be­ing. It is what gives us the peace we all want to at­tain, but achiev­ing a bal­ance be­tween the two can be quiet a bat­tle. To­day, I can hap­pily say that I found that bal­ance. Did I strug­gle? Yes. But what’s more im­por­tant here, is not the strug­gle but the fact that I emerged vic­to­ri­ous. I be­lieve so will you. I did not just get up one day and take to the next fad diet ev-

ery­one was do­ing and achiev­ing re­sults with, I found a per­ma­nent so­lu­tion. I chose a healthy life­style. So here is my story about the boxing match against my weight I fi­nally won.

Body shamed for Be­ing too fat

Main­tain­ing a healthy num­ber on the weigh­ing scale had al­ways been a tus­sle; my love for food and strug­gle with ex­cess weight went hand-in-hand. In school, I was the most over­weight girl in the room and I had trou­ble ac­cept­ing my body for what it was. There was enough body sham­ing from fam­ily and friends. The turn­ing point came when my teacher in school asked me to stand up in class as an ex­am­ple for be­ing the fat­test child and asked me what I ate the whole day. I was 13 then but be­came ob­sessed with the idea of los­ing weight. Un­for­tu­nately, the con­cept of gyms and work­ing out was very un­com­mon and in­for­ma­tion on the in­ter­net was sparsely avail­able. So I did what some of you have prob­a­bly done at some point - ate noth­ing and walked a lot. From 80 kgs, I went to 59 kgs, in a mat­ter of three months! But that was the worst way to shed the ex­tra ki­los. I was thin, yes, but was I fit? As a nu­tri­tion con­sul­tant to­day, I know that was the big­gest mis­take I made.

starv­ing, and ex­er­cis­ing

Then, at the peak of my teenage years, I joined a gym but that did me no good. The train­ers lacked knowl­edge, didn’t un­der­stand my body and what it needed. I was con­vinced that as long as I was work­ing out for hours, I could eat any­thing I wanted. And so it went on, for 12 long years, a slow de­struc­tion of my health. I looked thin, but again, I was not fit. I weighed 53 kgs and was happy with what I saw in the mir­ror. But un­der those per­fect look­ing clothes, my skin was sag­ging and my mus­cles lacked def­i­ni­tion.

moth­er­hood & more weight

Then, came moth­er­hood. In spite of be­ing health con­scious, I went onto gain 17 kgs dur­ing my preg­nancy. Ev­ery­one thought that I would never lose my weight and con­soled me by say­ing, ‘Now you are a mother, ac­cept this body’. I be­came a proud mother of a beau­ti­ful child, but I didn’t feel beau­ti­ful. I was not happy with the new me at 70 kgs. When I looked at my­self in the mir­ror, I saw the 13-year-old star­ing back at me. I had be­come ir­ri­ta­ble, which even­tu­ally lead to de­pres­sion. There was a lot at stake and some­thing had to be done and done right.

The turn­ing point came when my teacher in school asked me to stand up in class as an ex­am­ple for be­ing the fat­test child and asked me what I ate the whole day.

de­pressed, But not out

That’s when I de­cided to study nu­tri­tion. I wanted to be fit, strong and have en­ergy so I could play and run be­hind my child with­out huff­ing and puff­ing. So my big­gest mo­ti­va­tion was my daugh­ter. I re­alised the slow and steady pro­gres­sion of get­ting fit. I be­gan read­ing and re­search­ing ev­ery­thing I could, on con­cepts and ideas of nu­tri­tion and fit­ness. Ob­vi­ously, I couldn’t go through this jour­ney with­out the sup­port of my hus­band and fam­ily who en­cour­aged me to be­come fit and healthy. Also, my big­gest guid­ance was my trainer in the gym Dhi­raj, he pushed me to work harder to achieve my dream and guided me with my work­outs.

vic­tory point

When I at­tained the body I de­sired my whole life af­ter my preg­nancy, I re­al­ized if that I could do it, why can’t other peo­ple? I started as a fit­ness blog­ger and slowly, Neha

Sa­haya Well­ness was born. I de­cided to turn my pas­sion into my ca­reer. I re­mem­ber meet­ing peo­ple at cof­fee shops and pre­scrib­ing di­ets for them. To­day, I am suc­cess­fully run­ning my own of­fice and busi­ness at a big­ger scale. I still write as a blog­ger and my main mo­ti­va­tion page is my in­sta­gram @ne­hasa­haya where I give tips on diet and work­outs.

take home mes­sage

There is noth­ing like a quick fix for life­style dis­eases and weight loss as that never helps in the long run. Bot­tom­line: Make a life­style change and don’t fol­low fad di­ets. A healthy life­style comes from a very deep-rooted phys­i­o­log­i­cal change, which once suc­cess­ful, comes nat­u­rally to you. To­day, when I see a buf­fet of food, to­day, I nat­u­rally veer to­wards the healthy op­tions. I fill my plate with veg­eta­bles and lean meats like chicken and fish.

I re­alised the slow and steady pro­gres­sion of get­ting fit. I be­gan read­ing and re­search­ing ev­ery­thing I could, on con­cepts and ideas of nu­tri­tion and fit­ness.

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