Fit­ness

Walk for ex­tra ben­e­fits

Health & Nutrition - - CONTENTS -

The Fam­ily-Time Walk

You talk, laugh, de­bate and some­times just hold hands; all are healthy. So is en­gag­ing in out­door ac­tiv­i­ties to­gether. Stud­ies have found that a 20-minute walk can calm your over­ac­tive brain and re­store your at­ten­tion.

The Mem­ory-Booster Walk

Mak­ing walk­ing a habit can pre­serve your mem­ory. Re­searchers fol­low­ing up on 300 older adults af­ter 13 years found that those who had walked six to nine miles a week low­ered their risk of mem­ory prob­lems by 50%.

The Tree Hug­ger’s Walk

Re­searchers sent a group of walk­ers into a forested area, and another walk­ers’ group into a city, for an hour. The for­est walk­ers had im­proved heart and lung func­tion; the city walk­ers didn’t. The mes­sage: Na­ture walks can be heal­ing.

The Philoso­pher’s Walk

Walk­ing is great for deep thoughts, but it pro­vides other brain perks (mem­ory boost aside). Adults who walked for 40 min­utes three times a week slowed age-re­lated de­clines in brain func­tion and im­proved their per­for­mance on cog­ni­tive tasks.

The Med­i­ta­tion Mas­ter’s Walk

If sit­ting on a pil­low and chant­ing ‘Om’ isn’t your thing, you can ac­tu­ally med­i­tate while you walk. Nu­mer­ous stud­ies con­firm med­i­ta­tion’s abil­ity to ease high blood pres­sure, di­ges­tive chal­lenges, anx­i­ety, de­pres­sion and in­som­nia.

The So­cial­izer’s Walk

Tak­ing walks with friends is not just fun; it’s ben­e­fi­cial, too. One study showed that people who joined walk­ing groups had lower blood pres­sure, re­duced choles­terol, a lower rest­ing heart rate and more ef­fec­tive weight loss.

Mak­ing walk­ing a habit can pre­serve your mem­ory. Re­searchers fol­low­ing up on 300 older adults af­ter 13 years found that those who had walked six to nine miles a week low­ered their risk of mem­ory prob­lems by 50%.

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