Year on, ques­tions re­main over life skills train­ing from Class 6

Sec­tion of ex­perts crit­i­cises CBSE for im­ple­ment­ing life skills cur­ricu­lum at Class 6 stage, say­ing that by that time child be­comes too ma­ture for it

Hindustan Times (Chandigarh) - Live - - EDUCATION - [email protected]­dus­tan­times.com Cog­ni­tive life skills Prac­ti­cal life skills In­ter-per­sonal life skills Emo­tional life skills

Eileen Singh CHANDI­GARH: With an ob­jec­tive to cre­ate an in­te­grated ap­proach to learn­ing and teach­ing that places book­ish learn­ing into prac­ti­cal ap­pli­ca­tion in a child’s life, the Cen­tral Board of Sec­ondary Ed­u­ca­tion (CBSE) had launched cur­ricu­lum-based on life skills for stu­dents of Class 6 and above in the 2012-13 ses­sion.

How­ever, a group of in­tel­li­gentsia feels that Class 6 stage is too late for a child to learn life skills, as by the time a child be­comes too ma­ture to learn life skills; hence, the CBSE should im­ple­ment the cur­ricu­lum at the en­try level.

The chil­dren should be ex­posed to life skills at an early stage, when their learn­ing was based on real life ex­pe­ri­ences; for ex­am­ple, on Baisakhi prepri­mary chil­dren un­der­take ex­er­cises like grind­ing wheat to make ro­tis or churn­ing out but­ter us­ing tra­di­tional churn­ers on Jan­mash­tami, said Madhu Tre­han, prin­ci­pal of Firstep Montes­sori School, Panchkula.

How­ever, many pro­gres­sive schools across tricity have im­ple­mented the cur­ricu­lum at pre pri­mary level con­sid­er­ing adapt­abil­ity of a child.

“Life skills work on a child’s adap­tive be­hav­iour and at­ti­tude and thus pre­pare a child to han­dle var­i­ous sit­u­a­tions and de­mands of life,” Mon­ica Sandhu, a child psy­chol­o­gist.

“Where most of the schools are busy pro­vid­ing am­ple lessons to im­prove a child’s cog­ni­tive skills, some other are work­ing hard not to ig­nore per­sonal and in­ter-per­sonal skills of a child,” added Sandhu.

Whereas Cen­tral Board of Sec­ondary Ed­u­ca­tion re­gional of­fi­cer RJ Khan­derao said: “CBSE is im­ple­ment­ing var­i­ous strate­gies to make sure that fu­ture gen­er­a­tion is equipped

Life skills work on a child’s adap­tive be­hav­iour and

at­ti­tude and thus pre­pare a child to han­dle var­i­ous sit­u­a­tions and de­mands of life MON­ICA SANDHU

well with life skills early in life. The main pur­pose of the skill­based learn­ing is to cre­ate an in­te­grated ap­proach to learn­ing and teach­ing that places book­ish learn­ing into prac­ti­cal ap­pli­ca­tion in a child’s life.”

Priya Me­hta, a par­ent, said: “Giv­ing life skills ed­u­ca­tion to chil­dren sep­a­rately is base­less, as par­ents are teach­ing them enough.”

“The schools need to im­bibe a cur­ricu­lum along with cour­ses that helps the chil­dren learn ba­sic things like how to talk or how to be­have in pub­lic,” said Su­veechi Chaud­hary, a child coun­sel­lor with Crest Coun­sel­ing Ser­vices.

TYPES OF LIFE SKILLS

The main pur­pose of cog­ni­tive life skills is to de­velop in­tel­lect of chil­dren with an in­te­grated ap­proach to learn­ing and

Schools need to im­bibe a cur­ricu­lum

along with cour­ses that helps the chil­dren learn ba­sic things like how to talk or how to

be­have in pub­lic SU­VEECHI CHAUD­HARY

teach­ing that places book­ish learn­ing into prac­ti­cal ap­pli­ca­tion. The con­tent of cog­ni­tive skills not only fo­cuses on ‘what’ fac­tor of learn­ing, but also looks into ‘how’ fac­tor.

Th­ese skills pro­vide chil­dren with con­tent and in­tel­lect that they can use in per­sonal and pro­fes­sional life. Im­ple­men­ta­tion of th­ese skills in prac­ti­cal form brings academia closer to real life and adds rel­e­vance to the school ed­u­ca­tion.

To pro­vide chil­dren with am­ple op­por­tu­ni­ties to con­duct their daily life ac­tiv­i­ties like dress­ing/un­dress­ing, clean­ing sur­round­ings, pre­par­ing sim­ple meals or drinks etc in­de­pen­dently. Tod­dlers have a strong in­cli­na­tion to im­i­tate chores, which their fa­ther or mother han­dle at home.

Chil­dren at­tain in­de­pen­dence in daily chores early in life that con­se­quently re­sults in for­ma­tion of self­es­teem and con­fi­dence. Such early formed traits are life-long as­sets for chil­dren.

Th­ese skills teach chil­dren how to un­der­stand and in­ter­act ef­fec­tively with fam­ily mem­bers, friends, teach­ers and oth­ers. Chil­dren also learn how to co­op­er­ate with oth­ers while work­ing in groups, to em­pathise with peers and to learn how to be a leader or fol­lower un­der dif­fer­ent cir­cum­stances.

Chil­dren learn to man­age their so­cial skills well like how to han­dle re­la­tion­ships, how to con­duct one­self in a group etc go a long way in be­ing an ef­fec­tive group mem­ber.

The idea of im­ple­ment­ing emo­tional in­tel­li­gence life skills cur­ricu­lum in class­rooms is to in­tro­duce chil­dren to var­i­ous emo­tions they might go through and pre­pare them to man­age it well on a given day.

Chil­dren who are able to recog­nise their emo­tions well usu­ally pos­sess good un­der­stand­ing and emo­tional man­age­ment ca­pa­bil­i­ties. They are also able to un­der­stand sim­i­lar emo­tions in oth­ers and con­se­quently do act in a so­cially re­spon­si­ble man­ner.

Dear Read­ers,

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.