WEB IS DELHI’S NEW LAN­GUAGE SCHOOL

City res­i­dents are opt­ing for mo­bile apps and web­sites over reg­u­lar classes to learn new lan­guages

Hindustan Times (Gurugram) - City - - HTCITY MY CITY - Henna Rakheja henna.rakheja@htlive.com ■

When com­mut­ing on the Metro or chilling with friends at a mall, don’t get star­tled if you no­tice some­one try­ing to well, talk to their phone or lap­top in an un­fa­mil­iar tongue. Sneak a harm­less peep into their screen, and you’re likely to find that the gad­get user is try­ing to learn a new lan­guage.

“It’s eas­ier to learn this way, on my mo­bile,” says Farah Hus­sain (name changed), a 28- year-old me­dia pro­fes­sional. On her way home af­ter of­fice, she finds it con­ve­nient to ac­cess tu­to­ri­als on her phone and learn to trans­late English to Korean. “I wanted to learn Korean, but get­ting ad­mis­sion in lan­guage classes is dif­fi­cult for a per­son like me who has an er­ratic work sched­ule. But I didn’t want to give up the idea. I had started watch­ing Korean dra­mas, but some­times the sub­ti­tles didn’t match the ac­tors’ ex­pres­sions, and I was left with an un­sat­is­fac­tory ex­pe­ri­ence. I didn’t want to be lost in trans­la­tion, so I opted to learn Korean on­line,” she says.

An­other Del­hi­ite, 30-yearold PhD scholar Sab­hy­ata Prakash de­cided to learn Turk­ish, af­ter de­vel­op­ing a lik­ing for Turk­ish TV dra­mas. “I found that their content was great, very dif­fer­ent from the In­dian saas-bahu sagas. But one thing I hated was the poor dub­bing in Hindi. So, I started watch­ing the orig­i­nal shows on­line with English sub­ti­tles. I be­gan pay­ing at­ten­tion to the lan­guage, too. To un­der­stand the di­a­logues, story and cul­ture bet­ter, I made notes and prac­tised through on­line tests and web­sites,” says Prakash, who has picked up the basics.

Ut­sav Bansal, an MBA stu­dent at Delhi Univer­sity’s Fac­ulty of Man­age­ment Stud­ies, aims to ac­quire a cer­ti­fi­ca­tion course in French lan­guage. “But, to be able to get ad­mis­sion in the course of my choice, I need to know French till the pri­mary level. Since, I didn’t have time in be­tween my hec­tic sched­ule, I thought of learn­ing it from a mo­bile app. Although I’m still a be­gin­ner, I’m happy I chose this medium be­cause I’m in Mum­bai for my sum­mer in­tern­ship now, but don’t have to miss my lan­guage learn­ing ses­sions, since it’s on­line,” says Bansal.

A WORD OF CAU­TION

Lan­guage teach­ers warn that the in­for­ma­tion on­line can be in­ac­cu­rate. “The qual­ity of teach­ing can­not be guar­an­teed,” says Kwak Mira, ed­u­ca­tion man­ager at Korean Cul­tural Cen­tre. For those in­sist­ing on an on­line course, Mira ad­vises find­ing an au­tho­rised course. “Check the teacher’s pro­file and visit only rec­om­mended sites.”

I wanted to learn Korean, but get­ting ad­mis­sion in lan­guage classes is dif­fi­cult for a per­son like me who has an er­ratic work sched­ule... So I opted to learn it on­line.

FARAH HUS­SAIN (NAME CHANGED)

A ME­DIA PRO­FES­SIONAL

To un­der­stand the di­a­logues, story and cul­ture bet­ter while watch­ing Turk­ish TV shows with English sub­ti­tles, I started mak­ing notes and prac­tised through on­line tests and web­sites.

SAB­HY­ATA PRAKASH

A PHD SCHOLAR

PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.