THE CHANG­ING MAR­WARI FAM­ILY STRUC­TURE

Marwar - - Contents - Com­piled by Joseph Rozario and Pooja Mu­jum­dar

Once an in­dis­pens­able part of the Mar­wari com­mu­nity, the joint fam­ily struc­ture has, how­ever, lost some ground over the decades, and to­day nu­clear fam­i­lies are not un­com­mon. Is this change likely to ad­versely af­fect Mar­waris as a business com­mu­nity? MAR­WAR finds out from em­i­nent mem­bers of the com­mu­nity.

Once an in­dis­pens­able part of the Mar­wari com­mu­nity, the joint fam­ily struc­ture not only served as a bind­ing force that pro­moted unity and di­vi­sion of labour, but also as a for­mi­da­ble set-up that worked to­wards com­mon goals and ob­jec­tives, con­tribut­ing greatly to the over­all suc­cess of Mar­waris as a business com­mu­nity. The joint fam­ily con­cept has, how­ever, lost some ground over the decades, and to­day nu­clear fam­i­lies are not un­com­mon.

Is this change likely to ad­versely af­fect Mar­waris as a business com­mu­nity? MAR­WAR finds out from em­i­nent mem­bers of the com­mu­nity.

NIVESH KHAN­DEL­WAL CEO, Let­sMD.com

One of the ma­jor pos­i­tives of the break-up of the joint fam­ily sys­tem is that it does not lead to in­ter­nal dis­putes, thereby im­pair­ing the fam­ily business. Fur­ther, each per­son be­comes aware of his or her own in­come and ex­pen­di­ture, which helps align in­come with his/her role in the fam­ily business. This has led to peo­ple work­ing harder in many cases, as they feel they might not gen­er­ate the same in­come by switch­ing jobs, or by start­ing their own business. Usu­ally Mar­wari joint fam­i­lies are con­ser­va­tive in na­ture and may not al­low women to work. With nu­clear fam­i­lies, it has be­come more con­ve­nient for women now to have equal op­por­tu­nity in work­places. sup­port­ing struc­ture gone, mem­bers have to di­vide their time be­tween pro­fes­sional and house­hold work. It also makes co­or­di­na­tion tough, as ac­cess to each other gets lim­ited to oc­ca­sions and events only.

KR­ISHNA GUPTA MD, Lloyds Lux­u­ries

Mar­wari busi­nesses have mostly been built on trust and by har­ness­ing knowl­edge and ex­per­tise from a trusted few— the fam­ily mem­bers. In Mar­wari busi­nesses, which are mostly fam­ily- run, each fam­ily mem­ber plays a vi­tal role in the suc­cess of the business. With this re­duc­ing, in the fu­ture it is likely to im­pact the Mar­wari business com­mu­nity. This is mainly be­cause it’s dif­fi­cult to find trust­wor­thy em­ploy­ees to run and ex­pand a large- scale business— it’s hard to rely on peo­ple who are not a part of the fam­ily and en­trust them with han­dling im­por­tant and cru­cial parts of the business. With the joint fam­ily con­cept los­ing ground, I feel fac­tors like these could neg­a­tively im­pact Mar­wari busi­nesses and cause de­lays in achiev­ing suc­cess, thereby re­duc­ing the num­ber of suc­cess­ful and pow­er­ful Mar­wari business houses, go­ing for­ward.

DIMPLE NAHAR Owner & Founder, 2Divine - The Life­style Tem­ple

I be­lieve that break-up of the joint fam­ily sys­tem is not likely to se­ri­ously im­pact Mar­waris as a business com­mu­nity. Every Mar­wari fam­ily func­tions dif­fer­ently; some are be­com­ing pro­gres­sive and nu­clear with time as they open up to new ven­tures and pos­si­bil­i­ties. The fac­tors that had bound them ear­lier in the joint set-up, how­ever, have not de­te­ri­o­rated with liv­ing apart, since they con­tinue to give im­por­tance to work and fam­ily. Mar­wari fam­i­lies have changed in the way they func­tion over the years. Firstly, the ap­proach to­wards work is not ca­sual any­more. Se­condly, they are feel­ing the need to keep work and fam­ily sep­a­rate. Thirdly, since the early 2000s, a wave of pro­fes­sion­al­ism and mod­ernism has swept into the com­mu­nity, do­ing away with pre­vi­ous neg­a­tive as­pects of business. For ex­am­ple, at 2Divine - The Life­style Tem­ple, I look into mat­ters per­son­ally run the business smoothly likes to take ac­count­able risks not just look for ex­pe­ri­ence nowa­days but for tal­ent and de­ter­mi­na­tion too.

SONAL SAWANSUKHA Founder and Cre­ative Di­rec­tor, Jewel Saga

I come from a Mar­wari joint fam­ily that has been in the gem­stone business for three gen­er­a­tions. When I set out to pur­sue my dream, my fam­ily en­cour­aged me to fol­low the en­tre­pre­neur­ial path and in­tro­duced me to a new business ver­ti­cal. Be­ing al­ways pas­sion­ate about jew­ellery de­sign, I ac­quired a de­gree for the same and ini­ti­ated my business. From the ini­tial fam­ily’s con­tri­bu­tion made a big dif­fer­ence in ev­ery­thing. Also, my fam­ily and its good­will in the trade helped me es­tab­lish my brand. Hav­ing a big joint fam­ily also made me more re­laxed when it came to house­hold re­spon­si­bil­i­ties. If I had be­longed to a nu­clear fam­ily, set­ting out as an in­de­pen­dent en­tre­pre­neur would have made my jour­ney that these new dy­nam­ics are surely af­fect­ing us Mar­waris as a business com­mu­nity.

TRISHLA SURANA Founder and De­signer, Colour Me Mad

Mar­waris have al­ways had a strong fam­ily struc­ture which business ethos. Fam­ily-owned business struc­tures have worked for them and they have thrived for gen­er­a­tions be­cause of it. How­ever, with chang­ing times, nu­clear fam­i­lies are be­com­ing more com­mon. As a con­se­quence, busi­nesses are seen to be com­ing un­der in­creas­ing pres­sure to sur­vive and thrive. Given that our younger gen­er­a­tions are in­creas­ingly choos­ing al­ter­na­tive ca­reers and that busi­nesses these days of­ten are un­der pres­sure to rein­vent them­selves, there is an in­creas­ing need to pro­vide our younger gen­er­a­tions the op­por­tu­nity to di­ver­sify and keep the business rel­e­vant to the cur­rent sce­nario. The older gen­er­a­tions can fa­cil­i­tate this tran­si­tion while also con­tin­u­ing to pass down their man­age­ment skills, which the Mar­wari com­mu­nity is well known for.

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