WAY FOR­WARD

Mid Day - - Music -

him,” Gulzar an­nounces, cred­it­ing Rah­man for break­ing Bol­ly­wood’s mo­not­o­nous ‘mukhda-mu­sic-an­tara-link line’ for­mat. “In his com­po­si­tion, you never know when he’ll re­turn to the asthai [pri­mary theme]. He has some­thing to say, and will de­scribe it in de­tail. That is a [trend] that was seen in clas­si­cal [mu­sic],” says Gulzar, adding that he’s still amazed by the com­po­si­tion of Rah­man’s Ae Ajn­abi (Dil Se, 1998). In a chat with mid-day, he re­calls ar­riv­ing at the hook line of the track that earned him global recog­ni­tion — Jai Ho. “I was work­ing in Chen­nai on an­other project and Rah­man asked if I would write a spe­cial song for him. He nar­rated a syn­op­sis and then played it on the key­notes. I found it in­ter­est­ing. When he fin­ished, I [ex­claimed] ‘jai ho’. He said, ‘Catch that word’.” If it comes to mak­ing amends, Anil Kapoor, who played the an­tag­o­nist in the film, play­fully re­veals he has a grudge to hold against Rah­man too. The lat­ter breaks into a smile as he re­veals what tran­spired dur­ing their win at the Golden Globes that year. “I was sit­ting next to him [Kapoor], and was feel­ing re­ally thirsty. He was so sweet, he said he’d get me a [soft drink]. So, he went to get it, and by the time he was back, I’d al­ready won the award.” Kapoor, ea­ger to watch an In­dian dom­i­nate

‘Rah­man had nar­rated a short syn­op­sis [of the film] and then played it on the key­notes. I thought it was in­ter­est­ing. When he fin­ished, I [ex­claimed] ‘jai ho’. He said, ‘Catch that word’’ Gulzar

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