KEEP UP WITH THE CHANGE

Here’s how to make di­a­per chang­ing a breeze dur­ing the cold months...

Mother & Baby - - CONTENTS - BY AARTI PATHAK

Win­ter di­a­per­ing tips to make life easy

Chang­ing di­a­pers is hard enough with happy peppy ba­bies mer­rily mov­ing their arms and legs all about, while you make sure that poo doesn’t get any­where that it is not sup­posed to. Brace your­self: the ap­proach­ing win­ters are go­ing to make things a tag harder. No one wants their baby to feel the bit­ing cold dur­ing nappy changes. So what can be done to en­sure that the di­a­per chang­ing process is a pleas­ant one for the dar­ling baby? Well, lots !

1. KEEP EV­ERY­THING READY BE­FORE HAND:

New di­a­per, tal­cum/creams, new py­ja­mas and sheets. What­ever you need, keep ready first.

2. ROOM HEATER:

If it is that cold that it’s got you con­cerned about the chill he is ex­posed to dur­ing di­a­per change, keep the room warm with a room-heater. Not above 24 to 25 de­grees. Place warm flan­nel sheets be­low baby for di­a­per changes. Try to be quick and ef­fi­cient through the whole process till baby is dressed and cov­ered again.

3. WARM WATER OVER COLD, AB­SO­LUTELY:

Make sure you have com­fort­able warm water ready in the bath­room for wash­ing baby bums. If not, then pre­pare the water be­fore you un­dress baby for the change. Never use hot water di­rectly from the tap. Al­ways fill it in a bucket and check the tem­per­a­ture be­fore you use it on the baby. You can never be cau­tious enough when it comes to your li’l pre­cious.

4. THE WASH AND AFTER:

As soon as baby is cleaned up nice and proper, wrap him up with an ab­sorbent towel. Make sure the legs and feet are com­pletely cov­ered. Bring baby back to his room. Pat dry. Quickly dress him up again.

5. DRY WIPE:

If you do not want to do a water wash you could use warmed baby wipes to wipe the bums. But re­mem­ber that rub­bing with wipes can cause rashes even in just a few washes. So stay mind­ful of that and keep an eye out for signs of rashes. You could keep baby legs warm dur­ing the dry clean up us­ing warm adult socks to cover them. Dr Ram­neet Kataria Chab­bra shares, “Both my ba­bies were win­ter ba­bies. My younger one was born in Jammu and el­der one is Am­rit­sar. Both these places get quite cold in win­ter. For my first baby I used only cloth as those days it was be­lieved that di­a­pers are un­healthy and cause rashes. I man­aged it as I had fam­ily sup­port. Oth­er­wise, manag­ing tens of cloth di­a­pers is not easy for a new mother over and above car­ing for baby. For my sec­ond born I used im­ported di­a­pers and it was far more com­fort­able.

Baby stayed cozy, slept through the night and had no rash prob­lem. Also, re­cov­ery is far more dif­fi­cult for moth­ers in win­ters. I had c-sec­tions dur­ing both my de­liv­er­ies, and re­cov­ery was hard. So when baby was com­fort­able in di­a­pers, it brought respite to me as well.

An­tara Bansal, who lives in North­ern In­dia, brings along a great chal­lenge dur­ing win­ters if you have a lit­tle child liv­ing out of di­a­pers. “I rec­ol­lect from my ex­pe­ri­ence that I would sim­ply be shift­ing be­tween feed­ing the baby and chang­ing his di­a­pers every two hours. Due to an in­crease in wet­ting di­a­pers, there was this con­stant fear of my baby de­vel­op­ing rashes or feel­ing un­com­fort­able. Every di­a­per change would make me anx­ious that my child would catch a cold since it meant un­dress­ing him off the two or three lay­ers to cover him up from tem­per­a­tures close to 0 de­grees dur­ing peak win­ters. Worse, at night it could mean that great risk of wak­ing up the child from sleep mode due to the move­ment and un­dress­ing process. Sends down ‘chills’ even at the thought of those days!

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