Dev­dutt Pat­tanaik

The be­hav­ior of peo­ple around us is of­ten a re­flec­tion of their per­cep­tion of our own be­hav­ior, says Dev­dutt Pat­tanaik , Au­thor, Speaker, Il­lus­tra­tor, & Mythol­o­gist. For brand mar­keters and those in lead­er­ship po­si­tion in cor­po­rates and re­tail or­ga­ni­za­tio

Point of Purchase - - CONTENTS -

If they fear us, they be­have in a cer­tain way.

If they trust us, they be­have in a dif­fer­ent way. All be­hav­iors de­pend on how the other per­ceives

us. That per­cep­tion may be wrong, dif­fer­ent from how we per­ceive our­selves, but it re­mains

true to the per­ceiver. We can de­mand oth­ers change their per­cep­tions of us or we can de­cide to change our­selves, work

on mak­ing our­selves more trust­wor­thy rather than ex­pect­ing peo­ple to trust us. In the lat­ter

choice lies growth

Surya,

the sun-god, was hor­ri­fied when he no­ticed that the woman in his house was not his wife, Saranya but her shadow, Chaya. He stormed to the house of his fa­ther-in-law for an ex­pla­na­tion, only to learn that she had run away be­cause she could not bear his ce­les­tial ra­di­ance. Surya re­al­ized that, while in his story he was the vic­tim, in his wife’s story he was the vil­lain. That she slipped away in se­cret and kept a du­pli­cate in her place was an in­di­ca­tor of the ex­tent of her fear. Had he seen the world from her point of view, he would have re­al­ized, be­fore it hap­pened, what would frighten his wife and what would make her take the dras­tic step of run­ning away leav­ing a du­pli­cate in her place. This would have given him the op­por­tu­nity to change him­self and save their mar­riage. Surya then sought out his wife, and dis­cov­ered she had taken the form of a mare. In­stead of ask­ing her to change back to her hu­man form, he turned into a horse and fol­lows her to the pas­ture. Yes, he could ex­pect his wife to ac­cept him as he was, or com­pel her to change for him, but that would mean he is in­ca­pable of growth. Re­flect­ing on the other’s viewpoint prompts Surya to dis­cover his abil­ity to adapt, ac­com­mo­date and grow. From god he be­comes an­i­mal and leads a happy life in the pas­ture un­til Saranya is able once more to re­turn back to the sky by his side, as his god­dess. This story of Surya and Saranya re­veals how the be­hav­ior of peo­ple around us is a re­ac­tion to how they per­ceive us. If they fear us, they be­have in a cer­tain way. If they trust us, they be­have in a dif­fer­ent way. All be­hav­iors de­pend on how the other per­ceives us. That per­cep­tion may be wrong, dif­fer­ent from how we per­ceive our­selves, but it re­mains true to the per­ceiver. We can de­mand oth­ers change their per­cep­tions of us or we can de­cide to change our­selves, work on mak­ing our­selves more trust­wor­thy rather than ex­pect­ing peo­ple to trust us. In the lat­ter choice lies growth. For two years, Sandesh had headed the op­er­a­tions depart­ment and put in place a whole set of sys­tems and pro­cesses. With great dif­fi­culty, he had man­aged to get his team to align. The re­sults had been spec­tac­u­lar. Then Sandesh de­cided to spend more time on strate­gic long term think­ing and ap­pointed Ke­tan to han­dle the op­er­a­tions role. He just had to en­sure the sys­tems and pro­cesses set up over two years were be­ing fol­lowed. But no sooner did Sandesh han­dover the reins of the com­pany, ev­ery­thing went awry. No one fol­lowed pro­cesses, no one fol­lowed sys­tems, all re­ports were late. Sandesh was an­gry with Ke­tan and his team for fail­ing to do their jobs. But then he re­al­ized, the event re­vealed some­thing about him. He had in­sti­tuted the new pro­cesses by force of his per­son­al­ity. Align­ment hap­pened be­cause peo­ple fol­lowed him, not the process. So when Ke­tan re­placed him, ev­ery­thing col­lapsed. Ke­tan did not have the same force of per­son­al­ity as him. No mat­ter how much he blamed Ke­tan and his team, he was the source of the prob­lem. Now, he had to go back to fo­cus­ing on op­er­a­tions. But this time, like Surya, he had to change him­self. Coach peo­ple to do the tasks not be­cause he had told them to do it, but be­cause it was the job, in other words take own­er­ship of it. He also had to work with Ke­tan so that Ke­tan could take on the huge re­spon­si­bil­ity with­out feel­ing aban­doned and alone. By this one shift in think­ing, Sandesh had cre­ated a growth op­por­tu­nity for him­self

Dev­dutt Pat­tanaik Au­thor, Speaker, Il­lus­tra­tor & Mythol­o­gist

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