The right way to stay healthy and happy

Nu­tri­tion­ist and food coach Anu­pama Menon shows the way to stay­ing healthy and happy!

Savvy - - Contents -

The mind and the gut have an im­mor­tal con­nect, an im­plicit bear­ing on each other’s work­ing. The one nerve re­spon­si­ble for this sig­nif­i­cant as­so­ci­a­tion is called the va­gus nerve. The va­gus, the tenth cra­nial nerve, is the long­est run­ning one in the body. It stems from the brain and de­scends all the way down to the deep­est re­cesses of the in­tes­tine. It thus es­tab­lishes an in­de­struc­tible re­la­tion­ship be­tween the health of the gut and the work­ing of the brain.

When acid­ity strikes, the head hurts and when you are most stressed, the toi­let be­comes your favourite spot. The ner­vous­ness be­fore a big pre­sen­ta­tion finds its base in the rum­bling of the tummy and when your di­ges­tion is not right, your fo­cus is jeop­ar­dised. There are more than enough symp­toms that we ex­pe­ri­ence in our daily life that stands proof to the fact that the va­gus nerve knits a strong sig­nalling path­way be­tween the brain and the gut. Any com­pro­mise in the di­ges­tive sys­tem pierces neg­a­tive ef­fects on the brain and vice-versa.

This is where our gut mi­cro­biome, or the bac­te­ria that crowd our in­testines, plays a pru­dent role in the way the gut func­tions, and fi­nally the way we feel in terms of our fo­cus, hap­pi­ness quo­tient and men­tal well­be­ing.

The va­gus, the tenth cra­nial nerve, stems from the brain and de­scends all the way down to the deep­est re­cesses of the in­tes­tine. It thus es­tab­lishes an in­de­struc­tible re­la­tion­ship be­tween the health of the gut and the work­ing of the brain.

We are born with a gift - tril­lions of bac­te­ria in our gut that pro­duce 95% of the happy neu­ro­trans­mit­ter sero­tonin, peak nu­tri­ent ab­sorp­tion and main­tain the del­i­cate al­ka­line en­vi­ron­ment in the in­testines.

Hence, it is very im­por­tant that we keep these lit­tle ba­bies (our very own gut bac­te­ria) happy. It’s im­por­tant that we feed them and help them grow. It’s im­por­tant that we help the good bac­te­ria grow suf­fi­ciently enough to crowd out the bad guys (the bad bac­te­ria!). To­wards this, we need to take a few sim­ple steps:

Con­sume or­ganic fruits and veg­eta­bles as much as pos­si­ble.

Min­i­mize the use of hand san­i­tiz­ers. Avoid pro­cessed food and white sugar. Avoid pro­cessed flours and sol­vent treated oils.

Eat a clean diet by con­sum­ing at least four-five cups of veg­gies ev­ery day that will keep hunger at bay and feed the gut mi­cro­biome.

Make nat­u­ral pro­bi­otics like beet kvass, home fer­mented veg­gies and fruits, kim­chi, yo­ghurt and sauerkraut a part of our daily diet.

Re­duce the use of an­tibi­otics to only when ab­so­lutely es­sen­tial.

A healthy mind and body need a healthy gut and di­ges­tion that works like a well-oiled ma­chine. This re­quires just a lit­tle thought and a lit­tle plan­ning to en­sure your kitchen is pro­bi­oticfriendly and shuts the door to pro­cessed food. This, how­ever, de­mands a change in your life­style. Are you ready for that change?

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.