Luke Coutinho on Reit­ers Syn­drome - re­ac­tive arthri­tis

Luke Coutinho on Reit­ers Syn­drome - re­ac­tive arthri­tis - and find­ing a way for­ward…

Savvy - - Contents\ - Luke Coutinho, Ad­viser, In­te­gra­tive Life­style and Nutri­tion at Purenu­tri­tion.me

Typ­i­cally, arthri­tis is a con­di­tion when joints be­come in­flamed and painful, and mo­bil­ity of the joints is re­duced. Re­ac­tive arthri­tis (also called Reit­ers Syn­drome) is a type of arthri­tis that is caused be­cause of an in­fec­tion in an­other part pf your body, mostly your in­testines, gen­i­tals or uri­nary tract. Re­ac­tive arthri­tis tar­gets your knees and the joints of your an­kles and feet. Some­times, the in­flam­ma­tion also af­fects your eyes and skin.

CAUSES & RISKS

Re­ac­tive arthri­tis, on its own, is not con­ta­gious, but it’s caused by some in­fec­tions that are con­ta­gious and spread through sex­ual con­tact. Other in­fec­tions that can cause re­ac­tive arthri­tis in­fect the gut. One cause is sal­monella, that can come from eat­ing food or han­dling ob­jects that have the bac­te­ria.

Here are some pre­lim­i­nary fac­tors that in­crease your risk of re­ac­tive arthri­tis:

— Age: This con­di­tion is more preva­lent among adults be­tween 20-40.

— Gen­der: When it comes to food-borne in­fec­tions, women and men are equally likely to de­velop re­ac­tive arthri­tis. How­ever, men are more likely than women to de­velop re­ac­tive arthri­tis in re­sponse to sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted bac­te­ria.

SYMP­TOMS OF RE­AC­TIVE ARTHRI­TIS

— Pain and stiff­ness in joints such as knees, an­kles, feet, heels, lower back or but­tocks.

— In­creased fre­quency and dis­com­fort/ burn­ing sen­sa­tion dur­ing uri­na­tion.

— Swollen toes or fingers.

— Re­ac­tive arthri­tis can also af­fect the skin in a va­ri­ety of ways, in­clud­ing a rash on your soles and palms, plus painful mouth sores.

RE­AC­TIVE ARTHRI­TIS: THE WAY FOR­WARD

— Med­i­ca­tion Pain man­age­ment in­cludes in­take of an­tibi­otics and non-steroidal anti-in­flam­ma­tory drugs (NSAIDs) to help re­lieve pain and in­flam­ma­tion. How­ever, us­ing med­i­ca­tions will only help to a cer­tain ex­tent. The key here is to make holis­tic life­style changes in the way you eat and in the way you ex­er­cise.

KITCHEN IN­GRE­DI­ENTS

— Brome­lain Brome­lain, an enzyme de­rived from pineap­ple, is known to help re­duce in­flam­ma­tion and bat­tle re­ac­tive arthri­tis ef­fec­tively.

— Turmeric Turmeric con­tains an ac­tive com­pound called cur­cumin which is known to have ex­cel­lent an­ti­in­flam­ma­tory ef­fects and helps man­age Reit­ers Syn­drome.

Us­ing med­i­ca­tions will only help to a cer­tain ex­tent. The key here is to make holis­tic life­style changes in the way you eat and in the way you ex­er­cise.

— Ex­tra Vir­gin Olive Oil Apart from hav­ing im­mense ben­e­fits when it comes to main­tain­ing car­dio­vas­cu­lar health and cat­alyz­ing weight loss, EVOO is also ex­cel­lent at fight­ing in­flam­ma­tion and manag­ing re­ac­tive arthri­tis. Ex­tra vir­gin olive oil con­tains a com­pound called oleo­can­thal that helps fight in­flam­ma­tion and re­duces joint car­ti­lage dam­age. Bear in mind, you must choose the ex­tra vir­gin vari­ant of the oil as the re­fined ones are mostly de­void of this com­pound.

— Beet­root Beet­root is a rich source of be­ta­lain pig­ments which have strong an­tiox­i­dant and anti-in­flam­ma­tory prop­er­ties. One of these pig­ments, be­taine, helps re­duce in­flam­ma­tion and fights re­ac­tive arthri­tis.

— Gin­ger Gin­ger is an im­mune mod­u­la­tor that helps re­duce in­flam­ma­tion and man­age re­ac­tive arthri­tis. Ac­cord­ing to ayurveda, gin­ger is ef­fec­tive at warm­ing the body, which helps it break down the ac­cu­mu­la­tion of tox­ins in your or­gans. It’s also known to cleanse the lym­phatic sys­tem, our body’s sewage sys­tem.

— Ex­er­cise Reg­u­lar, mod­er­ate ex­er­cise goes a long way in im­prov­ing joint func­tion. Strength train­ing with weights is im­por­tant be­cause hav­ing strong mus­cles around the joint helps make the joint more sta­ble. It is im­por­tant to in­cor­po­rate ex­er­cises that in­crease the joint’s range of mo­tion and flex­i­bil­ity to sub­se­quently re­duce the stiff­ness and pain. Reg­u­lar ex­er­cise also helps in­di­vid­u­als main­tain healthy body weight, which puts less pres­sure on the joints.

— Warm & Cool Packs Ap­ply­ing warm packs to the af­fected joints may help re­lax the mus­cles, re­duce pain and in­crease blood flow. Ap­ply­ing cool packs to the af­fected joints may help re­duce swelling and pain caused by arthri­tis. A cool com­press that is ap­plied to the eyes may help al­le­vi­ate in­flam­ma­tion around the eye area. Cool packs should not be ap­plied for longer than 10 min­utes at a time.

— Bed Rest You may ben­e­fit from short pe­ri­ods of bed rest. Ly­ing down pe­ri­od­i­cally re­duces the pres­sure put on the joints, and it may help re­lieve pain and in­flam­ma­tion caused by arthri­tis.

Brome­lain, an enzyme de­rived from pineap­ple, is known to help re­duce in­flam­ma­tion and bat­tle re­ac­tive arthri­tis ef­fec­tively.

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