GIA New York Jew­elry Ca­reer Fair Draws Job Seek­ers

Solitaire - - SPECTRUM -

J ob seek­ers par­tic­i­pated in oneon-one ca­reer coaching with in­dus­try vet­er­ans spe­cial­is­ing in their field of in­ter­est.

More than 450 stu­dents, Ge­mo­log­i­cal In­sti­tute of Amer­ica (GIA) alumni, job seek­ers and in­dus­try pro­fes­sion­als con­nected with 56 com­pa­nies look­ing to hire and 23 ca­reer coaches of­fer­ing ex­pert ad­vice at GIA’s New York Jew­elry Ca­reer Fair on March 8th. The an­nual event paved the way for new tal­ent and those look­ing to en­ter the gem and jew­ellery in­dus­try with a unique op­por­tu­nity to net­work di­rectly with com­pa­nies.

“The record num­ber of re­cruiters and the qual­ity of the job seek­ers made this Jew­elry Ca­reer Fair one for the record books,” said GIA se­nior vice pres­i­dent and chief marketing of­fi­cer Kathryn Kim­mel. “Now is a great time for pas­sion­ate peo­ple look­ing to move into or up in the gem and jew­ellery in­dus­try.”

The open­ing panel, “Job Suc­cess in To­day’s Mar­ket,” fea­tured com­pelling ad­vice from sea­soned pro­fes­sion­als and a re­cent GIA grad­u­ate, who shared lessons learned in their ca­reers and their pas­sion and ex­cite­ment for the in­dus­try.

Caryl Capeci, pres­i­dent of Hearts on Fire, opened the panel with the ob­ser­va­tion, “[Your] jour­ney is a se­ries of de­ci­sions that you make… some are good, some aren’t so good, but you know what? You learn some­thing from ev­ery sin­gle step you take.”

Lisa Bridge, pres­i­dent and CEO of Ben Bridge Jew­el­ers, said about sell­ing jew­ellery, “It is so im­por­tant to re­mem­ber what it is that makes this busi­ness spe­cial – these in­cred­i­ble mo­ments we get to be a part of.”

Re­cent GIA grad­u­ate Daniel Wis­ner, as­sis­tant tech­ni­cal de­signer at Alexis Bit­tar, shared what it was like to start his own busi­ness. “Start­ing a busi­ness means you get a crash course in ev­ery­thing you never thought you’d do,” said Wis­ner. “It’s not just hav­ing an idea. It’s tak­ing a leap and learn­ing to be un­com­fort­able.”

Lisa Nik­far­jam, pres­i­dent of Lisa Nik Inc., said, “Be care­ful not to be dis­tracted by the ad­vice of other peo­ple. You have to stay true to your path and pas­sion.”

Ti­mothy B. Matthews, pres­i­dent and CEO of Jew­elry Tele­vi­sion, said, “Have an at­ti­tude about be­ing oth­ers-cen­tric in­stead of be­ing self-cen­tric, you will be amazed about how much fur­ther your ca­reer can ad­vance.”

The suc­cess of GIA’s Jew­elry Ca­reer Fair over the past 28 years is due to the gen­er­ous men­tor­ship of ca­reer coaches, the ex­per­tise of pan­el­lists and par­tic­i­pa­tion of re­cruiters.

GIA Jew­elry Ca­reer Fairs will be held in Lon­don on April 5th and in Carls­bad, Cal­i­for­nia on Oc­to­ber 11th. For more de­tails, visit gia.edu/ca­reer-fair. Follow @GIANews #Jewel­ryJobs for up­dates.

“It is so im­por­tant to re­mem­ber what it is that makes this busi­ness spe­cial – these in­cred­i­ble mo­ments we get to be a part of.”

Open­ing speak­ers and “Job Suc­cess in To­day’s Mar­ket” pan­el­lists. (From left): Kathryn Kim­mel, GIA se­nior vice pres­i­dent and chief marketing of­fi­cer; Su­san Jac­ques, GIA pres­i­dent and CEO; Amanda Gizzi, direc­tor of pub­lic re­la­tions and spe­cial events for Jew­el­ers of Amer­ica; Caryl Capeci, pres­i­dent of Hearts on Fire; Lisa Bridge, pres­i­dent and CEO of Ben Bridge Jew­el­ers; Daniel Wis­ner, as­sis­tant tech­ni­cal de­signer for Alexis Bit­tar and re­cent GIA grad­u­ate; Lisa Nik­far­jam, pres­i­dent of Lisa Nik Inc.; and Ti­mothy B. Matthews, pres­i­dent and CEO of Jew­elry Tele­vi­sion.

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