BUSI­NESS SCOPE FOR CIVIL MRO IN IN­DIA

SP's Airbuz - - Table Of Contents - —The au­thor is Pres­i­dent & CEO, Em­braer Com­mer­cial Avi­a­tion

stu­dents shrunk an av­er­age of 2.7 per cent an­nu­ally over the last five decades.

The short­age has al­ready caused air­lines to can­cel hun­dreds of flights this year. Some com­mu­ni­ties lost air ser­vices com­pletely which forced pas­sen­gers to travel fur­ther just to get to a func­tion­ing air­port. The Com­mit­tee’s pro­posed mod­i­fi­ca­tion would al­low new hires to ob­tain a cer­tifi­cate with re­stricted priv­i­leges af­ter com­plet­ing an En­hanced Qual­i­fi­ca­tion Pro­gramme (EQP). With a pre­de­fined cur­ricu­lum, the pro­gramme would be ex­e­cuted mostly by re­gional air­lines with help from the FAA.

In short, this new way of think­ing equates hours in class­rooms and sim­u­la­tors with ex­pe­ri­ence op­er­at­ing an air­craft by ac­cu­mu­lat­ing “cred­its” to re­duce the to­tal num­ber of re­quired flight hours. Two credit ac­count­ing meth­ods were pro­posed: 250 aca­demic hours cred­ited for ev­ery can­di­date that com­pletes the EQP, ef­fec­tively re­duc­ing the re­quired flight hours by the same amount. 750 aca­demic hours cred­ited to can­di­dates that com­plete the EQP, ef­fec­tively re­duc­ing the re­quired flight hours by 250 for can­di­dates with mil­i­tary back­ground, 500 flight hours for can­di­dates with a four-year bach­e­lor de­gree and 750 flight hours for can­di­dates with two-year bach­e­lor de­gree. Air­lines are also de­vel­op­ing other al­ter­na­tives to mit­i­gate the prob­lem. Some are work­ing to at­tract new pi­lots at a much ear­lier age, even as early as high school. JetBlue Air­ways for ex­am­ple, has set up its own pro­gramme by of­fer­ing in­tern­ships for as­pir­ing com­mer­cial pi­lots while stu­dents are at the univer­sity. United Air­lines is link­ing up with flight train­ing schools and de­vel­op­ing ca­reer path pro­grammes so that stu­dents have a job upon grad­u­a­tion.

Car­ri­ers are also of­fer­ing gen­er­ous sign­ing bonuses, rais­ing pay scales and im­prov­ing ben­e­fits. One way to at­tract more pi­lots is to shorten the time to progress through train­ing and to ac­cu­mu­late qual­i­fy­ing hours. That time sav­ings trans­lates into cost sav­ings for a new re­cruit and up to two years more time earn­ing a ca­reer salary. That is a sig­nif­i­cant in­cen­tive.

There are en­cour­ag­ing signs that these ini­tia­tives are work­ing, par­tic­u­larly in the USA. Air­lines there are get­ting back on track to meet their fu­ture staff lev­els. I am op­ti­mistic that we, as an in­dus­try, will find new ways to bring a whole new gen­er­a­tion of pi­lots into the cock­pits of our air­planes.

Fly­ing is a fan­tas­tic ca­reer. If you are con­sid­er­ing a fu­ture in the skies, the air­line in­dus­try of­fers tremen­dous op­por­tu­nity and job se­cu­rity for pi­lots, es­pe­cially with such ro­bust growth in air travel pro­jected over the next twenty years.

THE AIR­LINE IN­DUS­TRY OF­FERS TREMEN­DOUS OP­POR­TU­NITY FOR PI­LOTS, ES­PE­CIALLY WITH SUCH RO­BUST GROWTH IN AIR TRAVEL PRO­JECTED OVER THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS

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