INTERLINING SO­LU­TIONS TO CON­SIDER IN SHIRT MAN­U­FAC­TUR­ING

Stitch World - - NEWS -

Interlining, as one the most im­por­tant trims, and fus­ing, as one of the most im­por­tant oper­a­tions done in a shirt, ful­fil both the aes­thetic and func­tional pur­pose of men’s shirts. How­ever, the ap­parel in­dus­try is still over­look­ing these two pro­cesses de­spite know­ing that choos­ing the right type of interlining and fus­ing method can do won­ders in achiev­ing both these pa­ram­e­ters. In the pre­vi­ous three ar­ti­cles ded­i­cated to shirt man­u­fac­tur­ing, Team StitchWorld talked about the var­i­ous as­pects of shirt man­u­fac­tur­ing where we dis­cussed about the ways a shirt is man­u­fac­tured, the tech­ni­cal details of shirt man­u­fac­tur­ing and the im­por­tant fea­tures to con­sider while mak­ing a shirt. In this fourth ar­ti­cle of the shirt series, we will discuss about interlining and its use in shirt man­u­fac­tur­ing.

Interlining is any­thing that is used be­tween two fab­rics to give a more firm and struc­tured look to the gar­ment. These are used in the de­tailed area of the gar­ment, such as the front of the coat, col­lar, cuff and pocket flaps and fur­ther help the com­po­nent of the gar­ment with ex­tra-wear­ing stress, such as neck­line, pock­ets, waist­band and but­tons, to re­tain the shape. There are two ways of us­ing interlining: sew or fuse. Sewn in­ter­lin­ings are gen­er­ally stitched be­tween two lay­ers of the fab­ric, whereas the fusible in­ter­lin­ings are bonded to the fab­ric us­ing heat and pres­sure. An interlining, when not used cor­rectly, re­sults in a num­ber of prob­lems such as bub­bling (lo­calised de­lam­i­na­tion), strike back (glue pen­e­trates back through the interlining) and strike through (glue pen­e­trates through the fab­ric and comes to the face side).

There­fore, choos­ing the right type of interlining from the dif­fer­ent op­tions avail­able in the mar­ket is very im­por­tant and at the same time can be a te­dious task. The interlining prop­er­ties should match with the prop­erty of fab­ric in the gar­ment to avoid any of the above men­tioned faults, for ex­am­ple, both the gar­ment and the interlining should have the same shrink­age level, if not then the in­ner fab­ric may shrink more than the outer fab­ric and vice versa. This may fur­ther re­sult in siz­ing prob­lem as the fin­ished gar­ment will be smaller than it was planned. It also leads to the for­ma­tion of puck­ered seam.

Clas­sic Dress Shirts – More stiff­ness re­quired

The clas­sic dress shirt with more stiff and com­fort­able col­lar is the next big up­com­ing trend. To main­tain the stiff­ness and sta­bil­ity of the col­lar, one should use hard interlining made up of 100 per cent cot­ton. Stiff­ness of the cot­ton interlining does not let it get eas­ily distorted while be­ing worn or cleaned by the wearer. Thereby, it ex­erts max­i­mum con­trol on shrink­age and shape re­ten­tion. The light­weight cot­ton fusible interlining with soft touch is the per­fect so­lu­tion to achieve the aes­thetic re­quire­ment and the stretch for the col­lar patch keeps the soft­ness in­tact with per­fect re­silience. An­other so­lu­tion is us­ing the interlining made from nat­u­ral fi­bres (such as wool, silk and veg), but these kinds of in­ter­lin­ings are not very well known for their soft han­dle and feel. How­ever, with rapidly evolv­ing in­no­va­tions, it has be­come pos­si­ble to use dif­fer­ent weaves like bro­ken twill or fab­ric.

The promis­ing brands for cot­ton in­ter­lin­ings are Freuden­berg, Wendler and Talco. The interlining has to be fused with the shirt col­lar patch to ob­tain the de­sired out­put. The cor­rect fus­ing op­tion in­cludes the right amount of pres­sure, heat and tem­per­a­ture to be fused. The ma­chines that can be used for this pur­pose should come with exit belt, re­turn belt or stacker de­vices for bet­ter qual­ity of fus­ing pro­cesses. Fur­ther, the ma­chines should be se­lected keep­ing the cool­ing sys­tem in mind as a cool­ing sys­tem with an il­lu­mi­nated area helps in po­si­tion­ing the interlining.

Sewing Interlining in a col­lar band The interlining prop­er­ties should match with the prop­erty of fab­ric in the gar­ment to avoid any faults. For ex­am­ple, both the gar­ment and the interlining should have the same shrink­age level, if not then the in­ner fab­ric may shrink more than the outer fab­ric and vice versa.

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