WEAPONS GRADE TECH

T3 India - - Man Vs Tech -

A GAD­GET BE­ING ‘MIL­I­TARY GRADE’ DOESN’T MEAN IT CAN DRIVE A TANK

You may have comes across the term ‘Mil­i­tary Stan­dard MIL-STD-810G Tested’ when brows­ing new tech, but do you know what it means? Well, in 1965 the US mil­i­tary de­vised a series of tests to eval­u­ate the dura­bil­ity of es­sen­tial equip­ment. These hard­core tests have since been com­man­deered by the tech world. They fo­cus pri­mar­ily on a prod­uct’s drop and shock lim­its, but also in­clude ex­treme tem­per­a­ture, hu­mid­ity and dura­bil­ity. V-Moda’s ar­moured Cross­fade 2 Wire­less head­phones (v-moda.com) wear their MIL-STD-810G badge with pride – they’re un­phased by big drops, the SteelFlex head­band is prac­ti­cally in­de­struc­tible, and the ca­bles can with­stand one million bends be­fore giv­ing up the ghost. steel bezel proves to be more than enough pro­tec­tion. As it should be for an ex­pen­sive time­piece.

USE THE FORCE

The smart­phone drop is prob­a­bly the most com­mon oc­cur­rence in tech. With an in­crease in edge-to-edge screens and glass rear pan­els for wire­less charg­ing the dan­ger of bro­ken glass is in­creas­ingly real. Ad­dress­ing the epi­demic, Mo­torola’s

Z2 Force Edi­tion mod­u­lar smart­phone sports ex­tra ar­mour – the An­droid hand­set has a 7000 series alu­minium uni­body de­sign, but it’s the ‘guar­an­teed’ shat­ter­proof Moto Shat­terShield screen that’s re­ally in­trigu­ing. I drop the phone on its front, back and cor­ners from in­creas­ingly un­com­fort­able heights and also chuck it around the room to re­ally test that Shat­terShield screen. What­ever I dole out, the Mo­torola han­dles with ninja-like com­po­sure. Fi­nally, it’s time for the big one…

As I peel back the sleek pack­ag­ing on a brand-new iPhone X, it dawns on me that I could be about to make an in­cred­i­bly ex­pen­sive mis­take. Af­ter all, the cost of re­plac­ing the 5.8-inch Su­per Retina dis­play with­out the lux­ury of

Ap­pleCare+ could set me back by a hefty sum. To keep the phone in one piece, Tech21 has sup­plied an Evo Check iPhone case and Evo Glass screen pro­tec­tor. The Evo Check case pro­vides three lay­ers of pro­tec­tion thanks to an im­pact-cush­ion­ing outer shell, a skele­tal frame that spreads the en­ergy of the im­pact, and a Flexshock sys­tem that dis­si­pates the re­main­ing en­ergy. Tech21 claims your iPhone X in its case (it also makes op­tions for other smart­phones, such as Galaxy and Pixel) will sur­vive a drop from three me­tres. Let’s see if that’s true…

I kick off at a con­ser­va­tive 1.5 me­tres, which is still high enough to to­tal an un-cased phone. The iPhone meets the ground with­out is­sue. Two me­tres? Noth­ing to see here, folks. My hands are get­ting clammy as I climb the lad­der again, tak­ing the iPhone X up to three me­tres. The phone takes an age to hit the deck, but when it lands it’s clearly un­phased by the ride. A

₹5,000 in­vest­ment (for the case and screen pro­tec­tor) to shield your `90,000 phone? This Tech21 kit is a no-brainer.

For now, the clum­si­est among us must find ways to pro­tect our gad­gets. With wa­ter­proof­ing com­mon on most mod­ern smart­phones we can only hope that in­te­grated drop-proof­ing will be­come the rule rather than the ex­cep­tion on high­value tech. In the mean­time, per­haps keep your phone away from the edge of the ta­ble, yeah?

IT DAWNS ON ME THAT I COULD BE ABOUT TO MAKE AN IN­CRED­I­BLY EX­PEN­SIVE MIS­TAKE

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