Parental in­sights to help schools un­der­stand stu­dents’ be­hav­iour

The Free Press Journal - - MUMBAI - RONALD RO­DRIGUES

Un­der­stand­ing stu­dents' be­hav­iour and psy­chol­ogy is an ef­fi­cient way to deal with stu­dents, and par­ents want to ex­tend their help to the state ed­u­ca­tion de­part­ment for the same. Par­ents claim they know their chil­dren's be­havioural pat­terns and want to share this in­for­ma­tion with schools so that it comes in handy for teach­ers while tack­ling class­room is­sues.

Most times, stu­dents pose be­havioural chal­lenges, which get in the way of class­room learn­ing, teach­ers lament. Some stu­dents are slow to learn, while oth­ers are quick learn­ers. Some stu­dents have a short at­ten­tion span, while oth­ers have a pho­to­graphic mem­ory but find it hard to grasp oral les­sons.

Par­ents claim they ob­serve their chil­dren’s be­hav­iour at home and would like to pro­vide this in­for­ma­tion to teach­ers. Par­ent Sid­dharth Ja­narde says, “At home, chil­dren of­ten tend to show be­havioural changes as they spend more time at home than school. As par­ents, we can come up with var­i­ous ba­sic reme­dies to tackle these changes at the ground level. If we get a chance to in­ter­act di­rectly with teach­ers, we can share this in­for­ma­tion and teach­ers can then use it as and if needed, in a class­room or school en­vi­ron­ment.”

Large class strengths make it tough to deal with each and ev­ery stu­dent. Priya Rathod, a teacher, says, “In gov­er­ment-aided schools, we teach and cater to around 40 to 60 stu­dents at a time. It be­comes dif­fi­cult to un­der­stand each and ev­ery stu­dent’s be­hav­iour and psy­chol­ogy and it would be great if par­ents could help us un­der­stand stu­dents in a broader way.”

In or­der to in­crease parental in­volve­ment, the state ed­u­ca­tion min­istry is plan­ning to set up a school man­age­ment com­mit­tee (SMC) in gov­ern­ment-aided city schools. The SMC will cre­ate a com­mon plat­form, where par­ents and teach­ers can meet twice a month or once a week, to dis­cuss stu­dents' is­sues, be­hav­iour, dif­fi­cul­ties and psy­cho­log­i­cal pat­terns.

Also, this will cre­ate trans­parency when it comes to school learn­ing and home learn­ing, as par­ents will get a clear pic­ture of what is taught in school. Ac­cord­ing to a se­nior of­fi­cer from the state ed­u­ca­tion de­part­ment, “SMC will bridge the gap and help par­ents un­der­stand school ac­tiv­i­ties bet­ter. It will also help teach­ers to un­der­stand each and ev­ery stu­dent ef­fi­ciently and thus en­hance the method of in­di­vid­ual ap­proach.”

School au­thor­i­ties men­tion they want to pro­vide a holis­tic en­vi­ron­ment for growth and the over­all de­vel­op­ment of stu­dents. The prin­ci­pal of a school said, “We want our stu­dents to en­joy ed­u­ca­tion through an in­ter­ac­tive and in­ter­est­ing way of learn­ing. A stu­dent-teacher re­la­tion is the need of the hour so we want to take ef­forts to build it.”

Most times, stu­dents pose be­havioural chal­lenges, which get in the way of class­room learn­ing, teach­ers lament. Some stu­dents are slow to learn, while oth­ers are quick learn­ers

At home, chil­dren of­ten tend to show be­havioural changes as they spend more time at home than school

Par­ents claim they ob­serve their chil­dren’s be­hav­iour at home and would like to pro­vide this in­for­ma­tion to teach­ers

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