The Hindu

HOLLANDE VOWS TO PUNISH IS FOR ATTACKS

Jihadist group claims reponsibil­ity in online statement mocking France’s involvemen­t in air attacks on suspected IS bases in Syria and Iraq

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French President Francois Hollande vowed to attack the Islamic State group without mercy as the jihadist group claimed responsibi­lity on Saturday for orchestrat­ing the deadliest attacks on France since World War II.

The Islamic State group’s claim of responsibi­lity appeared in Arabic and French in an online statement circulated by IS supporters. It was not immediatel­y possible to confirm the authentici­ty of the admission, which bore the group’s logo and resembled previous verified statements from the group.

The statement mocked France’s involvemen­t in air attacks on suspected IS bases in Syria and Iraq, noting that France’s air power was “of no use to them in the streets and rotten alleys of Paris.”

As Hollande addressed the nation, French anti-terror police worked to identify potential accomplice­s to the attackers, whose nationalit­ies and motives remained unclear.

Authoritie­s said eight attackers died, seven in suicide bombings, a new terror tactic in France. Police said they shot and killed the other assailant.

Officials said a Syrian passport was recovered from the remains of one suicide bomber outside the stadium and that a suicide bomber at the concert hall was identified as a young Frenchman flagged in the past for links with an Islamic extremist activity. Prosecutor’s office spokeswoma­n Agnes Thibault-Lecuivre said authoritie­s couldn’t rule out the possibilit­y that other militants involved in the attack remained at large. The violence raised questions about security for the millions of tourists who come to Paris and for world events routinely hosted in the normally luminous capital, where 1,500 troops were deployed to support police in restoring order and reassuring a frightened populace.

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve announced that all public demonstrat­ions would be banned until Thursday and local government­s would have the option to impose nightly curfews. He said police and military reinforcem­ents would be deployed to key public buildings.

Many of Paris’ top tourist attraction­s closed on Saturday, including the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre Museum and the Disneyland theme park east of the capital.

Parisians expressed shock, disgust and defiance in equal measure. Hundreds of soccer fans departing the stadium on Friday night waved French flags and sang impromptu choruses of the national anthem, “Le Marseillai­se.”

The next morning, hundreds queued outside a hospital near the Bataclan theater, scene of the most appalling violence, to donate blood. As a shrine of flowers expanded along the sidewalk, a lone guitarist sang John Lennon’s peace ballad, “Imagine.”

The attacks, on an unusually balmy November Friday evening, struck at the heart of Parisian life — diners in cafes, concertgoe­rs watching a rock band, spectators at a soccer match.

“These places are the places we visit every week,” said Ahsan Naeem, a 39-year-old filmmaker. “Streets we walk every day. I’ve seen dozens of gigs at the Bataclan. Eaten at the Petit Cambodge. Sat outside Le Carillon on so many nights.” Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo said the places attacked are ones Parisians love, where they celebrate diversity.

“It is this Paris that was hit, probably because this example of living together, which is so strong in our city, is unbearable for fanatical people,” she said.

Fear spreads across Europe

Reflecting fears in other European capitals of the risk of coordinate­d or copycat attacks, the British government mounted a meeting of its emergency committee, known as COBRA. Italy said it was raising security levels on borders and major public places.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said British citizens were among the casualties in Paris, but he declined to provide specifics. He warned that the threat posed by Islamic State “is evolving.” Friday night’s militants launched at least six gun and bomb attacks in rapid succession on apparently indiscrimi­nate civilian targets.

Three suicide bombs targeted spots around the national Stade de France stadium, north of the capital, where Hollande was watching a France-Germany soccer match. Fans inside the stadium recoiled at the sound of explosions, but the match continued.

Around the same time, fusillades of bullets shattered the clinking of wine glasses in a trendy Paris neighborho­od as gunmen targeted a string of crowded cafes. At least 37 people were killed, according to Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins. The attackers next stormed the Bataclan concert hall, which was hosting the American rock band Eagles of Death Metal. They opened fire on the panicked audience and took members hostage. As police closed in, three detonated explosive belts, killing themselves, according to Paris police chief Michel Cadot.

Another attacker detonated a suicide bomb on Boulevard Voltaire, near the music hall, the prosecutor’s office said.

Video shot from an apartment balcony and posted by newspaper Le Monde on Saturday captured some of that horror as dozens of people fled from gunfire outside the Bataclan down a passageway to a side street.

At least one person lies writhing on the ground as scores more stream past, some bloodied or limping. The camera pans down the street to reveal more fleeing people dragging two bodies along the ground. A woman and two others can be seen clinging to upper-floor balcony railings in an apparent desperate bid to stay out of the line of fire.

Le Monde said its reporter who filmed the scene from his apartment balcony, Daniel Psen-ney, was shot in the arm after he stopped filming, when he went downstairs to help someone who had collapsed in the alley.

A tall, sturdy 38-year-old concert-goer named Sylvain collapsed in tears as he recounted the attack, the chaos and his escape during a lull in gunfire.

“I was watching the concert in the pit, in the midst of the mass of the audience. First I heard explosions, and I thought it was firecracke­rs.

“Very soon I smelled powder, and I understood what was happening. There were shots everywhere, in waves. I lay down on the floor. I saw at least two shooters, but I heard others talk. They cried, ‘It’s Hollande’s fault.’ I heard one of the shooters shout, ‘Allahu Akbar,’” Sylvain told The Associated Press. He spoke on condition that his full name not be used out of concern for his safety.

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