The Hindu

Gently flow the notes

It’s Ustad Bismillah Khan’s birth centenary, and the shehnai is back in focus. SRINIVASA RAMANUJAM on how the instrument has been an integral part of film music in the South

- SCORING ON TRADITION

n a well-lit room on the second floor of his Saligramam residencec­um-music school, Pandit Ballesh and his son Krishna Ballesh are tuning their shehnais for a video recording.

Finding the right note is an arduous and time-consuming process, but the two enjoy it.

When they’re not taking classes in Hindustani music at their Tansen Academy, the father-son duo is busy touring the studios of Kodambakka­m and Vadapalani, where their music adds a different dimension to the music composer’s vision.

The shehnai, predominan­tly a North Indian wind instrument, was initially used in southern films to create pathos, but thanks to the likes of Ilaiyaraaj­a and A.R. Rahman, it has transition­ed into a ‘happy’ instrument, proving that it can portray celebratio­n as well.

“It is a tough instrument to play,” admits Pandit Ballesh, who shifted base from Karnataka to Madras in the early 1980s and started playing for films. “Even if it was a small piece, we would put a lot of effort into the recording, which, back then,

Iwould consist of an army of musicians.”

Things have changed since then — technology has played a major part in the way music is recorded — but Ballesh has laboured on, working with the who’s who of South Indian cinema, including the likes of M.S. Viswanatha­n, Ilaiyaraaj­a, A.R. Rahman and Keeravani. Today, he is accompanie­d by his son, Krishna, to many film recordings. “During the times of MSV and KV, composers used it mainly in classical mode, basing it on ragas.”

As time went by, the shehnai was adapted to other styles of music that were finding their way into popular film music. “It can be used to depict a range of emotions, and in different genres like folk and Western too,” adds Ballesh.

A software engineer by profession, Krishna, who trained under Ustad Bismillah Khan for seven years, is interested in taking the shehnai tradition forward. “I’d like to carry on this legacy, something that I’m very proud of,” he says.

During the times of MSV and KV, composers used it mainly in classical mode, basing it on ragas

 ?? PHOTO: R. RAVINDRAN ?? Pandit Ballesh and son, Krishna Ballesh
PHOTO: R. RAVINDRAN Pandit Ballesh and son, Krishna Ballesh

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