A brief about your­self….

The Ideal Home and Garden - - Ar­chi­tect Speak -

A brief about your­self...

Be­ing the son of two ar­chi­tects, I have grown up to ad­mire good de­sign. The need for a well scripted over­all ex­pe­ri­ence of space has be­come quin­tes­sen­tial to my no­tion of ex­is­tence. I like to see and read new things, and then trans­late my learn­ings into ideas for dif­fer­ent pro­jects.

So, who do you think is an ar­chi­tect?

To­day, in the age of so­cial me­dia with plat­forms such as In­sta­gram and Pin­ter­est, I think there is a thin line be­tween an ar­chi­tect be­com­ing a fa­cil­i­ta­tor vs. an ac­tual de­signer. I am still in­clined to think that an ar­chi­tect is the lat­ter - a per­son who mod­u­lates space to re­solve day to day needs of an in­di­vid­ual/group, while at the same time keep­ing in mind the over­all im­pact of that in­ter­ven­tion on the en­vi­ron­ment.

Do you still draw?

Ev­ery day! For me that is where all de­signs be­gin.

A sin­gle state­ment that can de­scribe your de­sign phi­los­o­phy?

De­sign, to me, is not static - it is a swirl of con­stantly chang­ing com­bi­na­tions of a va­ri­ety of as­pects and el­e­ments.

What have been the key driv­ers be­hind your suc­cess within such a short span of time? What did you do dif­fer­ently?

I am a big believer of col­lab­o­ra­tions. I do not think one per­son alone can change the world, and be­lieve in var­i­ous in­puts given by var­i­ous kinds of peo­ple. This has given me a great ad­van­tage and has led to a very di­verse body of work.

What’s next for you?

Our stu­dio is in the process of giv­ing struc­ture to these col­lab­o­ra­tions, which should be ready in the near fu­ture. I feel this is go­ing to be an ex­cit­ing new phase for us.

Who are your men­tors?

To be able to take in­puts from dif­fer­ent peo­ple, needs me to have an un­der­stand­ing of how dif­fer­ent minds work. I un­der­stand how Glenn Mur­cutt works. I like how Peter Zumthor de­signs, but I also like Renzo Pi­ano’s works, BV Doshi’s works and my par­ents’ works. I think hav­ing mul­ti­ple men­tors to look up to, helps me in learn­ing some­thing worth­while from each one of them.

It was dur­ing my 12th stan­dard that I came across the word ar­chi­tect. And my cu­rios­ity to know more about it was enough, to ask about the same to my el­der brother who in turn made me aware of both ar­chi­tec­ture and ar­chi­tect. This helped me de­cide my true call­ing and since then there was no look­ing back.

So, who do you think is an ar­chi­tect?

An ar­chi­tect is some­one who serves the society and im­proves the qual­ity of life of its peo­ple by his cre­ations. His de­signs should be based on en­vi­ron­men­tal sus­tain­abil­ity along with em­pha­sis on the aes­thetic as­pect.

Do you still draw?

Yes, ab­so­lutely. This is some­thing I have been do­ing since my school days as it helps me re­solve a num­ber of is­sues in­clud­ing the pre­lim­i­nary form of a de­sign. This is a sim­ple, fast yet ef­fec­tive process to use as it al­ways helps un­earth the best ideas and so­lu­tions to a de­sign prob­lem in a rel­a­tively less time com­pared to com­puter aided draw­ings.

A sin­gle state­ment that can de­scribe your de­sign phi­los­o­phy?

Less is more. This state­ment per­fectly de­scribes my de­sign phi­los­o­phy. I be­lieve in the nov­elty of the con­cept of a de­sign.

What have been the key driv­ers be­hind your suc­cess within such a short span of time? what did you do dif­fer­ently?

Dur­ing the past eight years of my ar­chi­tec­tural prac­tice, the very process that I have cho­sen to de­liver the so­lu­tion to each and ev­ery de­sign, is dif­fer­ent. Each project comes with its own set of chal­lenges and the fer­vour to de­liver in the most un­favourable set of cir­cum­stances is some­thing which drives me.

What’s next for you?

We are cur­rently work­ing on a num­ber of pro­jects in­clud­ing res­i­den­tial, hos­pi­tal­ity, com­mer­cial etc. There is a lot to learn and the best is yet to come.

Who are your men­tor’s?

In my case, in­no­va­tively crafted struc­tures both nat­u­ral and man-made and the pro­jects that I have worked on have had a last­ing im­pres­sion on me.

A brief about your­self...

I com­pleted my un­der­grad­u­ate de­gree in Ban­ga­lore and went to the U.S. for my mas­ters in Ur­ban plan­ning. I’ve al­ways been in­ter­ested in the im­pact of the build­ings we de­sign at a city level and the var­i­ous ur­ban forces and is­sues we have to con­tend with.

So, who do you think is an ar­chi­tect?

We cre­ate en­vi­ron­ments, or more specif­i­cally we mould an ex­ist­ing sit­u­a­tion, care­fully de­cid­ing what as­pects to em­pha­sise and en­hance. While a large part of our work is prob­lem solv­ing we also need to look be­yond be­cause an ar­chi­tect is con­cerned with not just the so­lu­tion, but the el­e­gance of the so­lu­tion.

Do you still draw?

Of course! While I am de­pen­dent on our com­puter, I still like to draw, sketch and make mod­els. This goes be­yond a per­sonal pref­er­ence be­cause I feel this process in­forms our de­ci­sion mak­ing.

A sin­gle state­ment that can de­scribe your de­sign phi­los­o­phy?

It’s hard to con­dense ev­ery­thing I do into a sin­gle sen­tence, but in terms of an ap­proach or at­ti­tude what I be­lieve in is be­ing thor­ough and dili­gent about the is­sues per­tain­ing to a de­sign prob­lem.

What have been the key driv­ers be­hind your suc­cess within such a short span of time? What did you do dif­fer­ently?

I have been for­tu­nate to have re­ceived com­mis­sions of var­i­ous scales and work­ing on a large master plan while si­mul­ta­ne­ously work­ing on a smaller in­te­rior project has helped us grow and each project feeds off the oth­ers.

What’s next for you?

I would like to con­tinue to de­sign spa­ces that are en­rich­ing and go be­yond the phys­i­cal pro­gram given by the client. For me it is im­por­tant to chal­lenge my­self to crit­i­cally ex­am­ine the con­text and re­spond mean­ing­fully.

Who are your men­tors?

There have been many in­flu­ences that have shaped my at­ti­tude to­wards de­sign. Doshi, Correa and Bawa have al­ways been a source of in­spi­ra­tion and I find my­self re­peat­edly re­fer­ring to their works even to­day.

I started my own firm. Since, I started work­ing at an early age, it gave me a con­fi­dence and busi­ness sense and within a span of five years, I was able to es­tab­lish my own firm. I have worked hard ev­ery sin­gle day and I con­sider that is my only key to suc­cess.

The UNO and Daddy by Lords + But­ter room si­t­u­ated in two very di­verged lo­ca­tions where UNO in Kolkata and Daddy by Lords in Ban­ga­lore. An­other up­com­ing project is The INOX, Jaipur, where we are cre­at­ing a sta­teof-the art the­atre with INOX the­atri­cal ex­pe­ri­ence in the pink city.

Who are your men­tors?

My men­tor in my formative years was my art teacher in school - Jen­son Anto. He taught me how to emote graph­i­cally, and made me com­pre­hend that it is pos­si­ble to evoke an emo­tion on pa­per. Later it in­spired me to be­come a sculp­tor in my early years.

MALAY DOSHI (Saransh Ar­chi­tects)

SU­MAN MISHRA Na­cence Ar­chi­tects)

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