The Smart Manager : 2019-02-12

Cover Story : 15 : 13

Cover Story

cover story 13 www.thesmartmanager.com The Smart Manager Jan- Feb 2019 as many people and businesses focus their professional development offerings on research points to empathy There is an increasingly large body of research pointing toward the skills that matter most when it comes to creating effective teams. As one example, Patrick Lencioni has written extensively about teams, both what makes them work and what does not. commitment, avoidance of accountability, and inattention to results. He suggests that some of the characteristics of a high performing team include comfort in asking for help and admitting mistakes, and taking risks in offering feedback. Recent research at Google points in a similar direction, showing that what distinguishes effective teams is how people interact. Having the right set of behavioral norms makes teams better at working together and achieving their goals, because these norms create a sense of psychological safety. People feel like they can take interpersonal risks and speak their mind without fear of embarrassment or rejection. Respect and trust characterize the interactions between team members. What are the so everyone on the team contributes, raising the collective intelligence. Second, people other words, they empathize. Having the right set of behavioral norms makes teams better at working together and achieving their goals, because these norms create a sense of psychological safety. the role of listening in empathy One of the most effective ways of empathizing is also one of the most basic of been understood as they would like to be, then they in turn are more likely to listen so as to understand others in the same way; this builds trust between people. With this kind of listening, over time people know they can be vulnerable. They can say things that might will not be personal repercussions. listening as a tool to create deeper understanding and connection Most people listen to others while actually thinking already about what they want to say. also includes being connected to the person you are listening to by being curious about understanding what they are saying and what needs they are seeking to meet. moment, you give the other person a sense of being fully heard. This process often helps the person who is speaking to you reconnect with themselves and in the process be clearer about what their needs are and how they might go about meeting those needs. There is something ineffable and incredibly valuable

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