The Smart Manager : 2019-02-12

Cover Story : 35 : 33

Cover Story

cover story ■ ■ ■ ■ 33 www.thesmartmanager.com The Smart Manager Jan- Feb 2019 then they translate into poor interpersonal and working relationships, and poor performance. Poor listeners are usually represented in uncomplimentary ways such that colleagues, direct reports, and others may say things like “She’s anyway going to do what she thinks is right, why bother expressing my thoughts?” or “He does not really care about what I think or say.” 01 you are easily distracted. Multi-tasking is a liability especially when you are supposed to be focussing your attention to actively listening to the person. To limit the calls, or show in any way that you are not interested in what is being said. Many times it so happens that leaders are already thinking of what comes next, they are already composing their response in their heads while the other person is still talking. This indicates your listening quotient is low—it is hard for you to focus on the speaker. 02 you are already thinking about your response. Many leaders just go into the problem-solving 03 you might offer your advice promptly. dissecting the message to look for a solution before the person has presented the whole problem and shared their thoughts? A person’s whole self is about 50 percent emotions that stem from her life and work experiences. If you are not in touch with others’ emotions, you could miss out on what is really happening with your team. Do not negate people’s feeling by telling not to feel the way they do, and try to provide an environment where they feel comfortable expressing their feeling. 04 you may dismiss others’ feelings. 05 you shun silence. the silent pauses. These reactions reduce the other person’s time to think and react. Do you take up most of the time talking in dialogues? to improve your listening, will ensure your message lands well and others understand and receive you better. Michael Hoppe, author of Active Listening, believes that the impact of poor listening is far-reaching. Assessments of thousands of leaders in CCL’s database indicate that many leaders fall short on abilities that directly relate to their listening skills, including: accepting criticism and making necessary changes in their behavior. trying to understand what other people think before making judgments. encouraging direct reports to share. imagining someone else’s point of view. The ability to listen effectively is an essential component of leadership, but few leaders know just what it takes to become a better listener. You can improve your ability to lead effectively by learning the skills for active listening. If you are not in touch with others’ emotions, you could miss out on what is really happening with your team. Do not negate people’s feeling by telling not to feel the way they do, and try to provide an environment where they feel comfortable expressing their feeling.

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