The Smart Manager : 2019-02-12

Cover Story : 39 : 37

Cover Story

cover story ■ ■ ■ 37 www.thesmartmanager.com The Smart Manager Jan- Feb 2019 explore constant interruptions. Once you do that, use EAR Model to do it right, that is, Explore, Acknowledge and Respond: Ask for permission, that is, seek to understand before you seek to be understood. This will help you better understand what is being discussed before you respond. And if you really understand, it may help you resolve the issue before you say anything at all. For example, instead of saying “Why do you always interrupt me when I am giving the team update?” try: “Help me understand what you want to accomplish with our update and what you think our roles should be?” acknowledge Sometimes called ‘active listening’, paraphrase or repeat back what you think the other person is saying, including emotions. “You want to make sure that your ideas are heard and you do not want to feel cut out or rushed to get your points across. I can see how that might be frustrating and stressful for you. It would be for me too.” respond Clarify what you need/want and why, then propose a solution. Use simple, direct set the context for you to give the details and manage the Q&A better (why). Let us agree on how much time each of us should take (solution).” (Would it help to practice for the quarterly and annual presentations?) Then, summarize agreement and show appreciation: “So, you are okay with me through with me. I know it will be a great presentation. I appreciate your candor and want you to come to me whenever you might be feeling there is an issue.” two-way communication is also important In my research of 52 top employee motivators, the highest-ranking variable that 95 percent of employees reported they want most from their managers is direct, open, and honest communication. Gone are the days where management is solely all about authoritative, one-way communication, ie, telling others what to do. Yes, telling people what to do can make the person who is doing the telling feel important, but at what cost? If the person you are communicating with feels disrespected in the process, how long will they keep working for you? The Gallup Organization found in their extensive research that the most important variable that accounted for an employee’s level of engagement was an individual’s immediate manager and all aspects that make up that relationship between a manager and his or her employees. This included all the things a manager did—and did not managers they have had in their career to quickly identify the actions and behaviors that are essential for any employee to feel supported and engaged. People want to know the necessary information to do the work they are assigned, what their co-workers are doing, and how the organization is doing as well. To keep your workforce engaged, it is important to communicate information to employees about the In my research of 52 top employee motivators, the highestranking variable that 95 percent of employees reported they want most from their managers is direct, open, and honest communication. Gone are the days where management is solely all about authoritative, one-way communication, ie, telling others what to do.

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