Train­ing boost for spe­cial ed­u­ca­tors

Equipped To Deal With All Kinds Of Dis­abil­i­ties

The Times of India (New Delhi edition) - - Times City - Shradha.Chet­[email protected] times­group.com

New Delhi: Dhar­men­dar Ku­mar, a spe­cial ed­u­ca­tor work­ing in a Delhi gov­ern­ment school, spe­cialises in deal­ing with chil­dren with visual im­pair­ment. How­ever, he says he can now also take care of chil­dren with learn­ing dis­abil­i­ties and men­tal re­tar­da­tion. This has been made pos­si­ble be­cause of the cross-dis­abil­ity train­ing pro­vided by the Direc­torate of Ed­u­ca­tion to equip spe­cial ed­u­ca­tors to han­dle chil­dren with all kinds of dis­abil­i­ties.

In­clu­sive ed­u­ca­tion is now an im­por­tant as­pect in all schools. When the spe­cial eduOrkids, with ex­per­tise in dif­fer­ent dis­abil­i­ties who are im­part­ing the train­ing. The process started in 2017 and it has now started show­ing re­sults.

Ku­mar, who was trained a few months ago, said, “My train­ing lasted five days in which I was taught about iden­ti­fy­ing chil­dren with learn­ing dis­abil­i­ties, con­duct­ing their as­sess­ment and to make a com­pre­hen­sive pro­gramme for their de­vel­op­ment.” He caters to 10 chil­dren in his school. He is a guest teacher with five years’ ex­pe­ri­ence.

“Though there are many con­straints con­sid­er­ing the large num­ber of stu­dents in gov­ern­ment schools, the ini­tia­tive has helped the chil­dren aca­dem­i­cally. We were also taught the im­por­tance of in­volv­ing other teach­ers and the prin­ci­pals so that the schools can be truly in­clu­sive,” said an­other spe­cial ed­u­ca­tor.

Dis­abil­ity ac­tivists said that such a step was nec­es­sary, though the gov­ern­ment schools still do not have an ad­e­quate num­ber of spe­cial ed­u­ca­tors. Ear­lier, Delhi gov­ern­ment was pulled up by a court over 1,500 va­can­cies in schools.

“Just train­ing spe­cial ed­u­ca­tors is not enough. It is also im­por­tant to sen­si­tise the heads of the schools be­cause if they are not open then a spe­cial ed­u­ca­tor won’t be able to per­form his task. There is also a need to pro­vide train­ing in newer dis­abil­i­ties like autism and dys­lexia,” said Sa­ten­dra Singh, dis­abled rights ac­tivist and teacher at Univer­sity Col­lege of Med­i­cal Sci­ences.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.