Reach a good Sa­mar­i­tan with a tap

CM KE­JRI­WAL’S NRC STATE­MENT TRIG­GERS WAR OF WORDS BE­TWEEN BJP AND AAP | 3 EPCA ASKS DELHI GOVT FOR EARLY EN­FORCE­MENT OF GRAP TO KEEP POL­LU­TION UN­DER CON­TROL | 5 Civil­ians Who Want To Help In A Cri­sis Can En­roll On Shout App; Cops To Ver­ify & Train Them

The Times of India (New Delhi edition) - - Times City - Sak­[email protected] times­group.com THE TIMES OF IN­DIA, NEW DELHI | THURS­DAY, SEPTEM­BER 26, 2019

New Delhi: In a bid to recog­nise the good Samaritans who in­vari­ably reach a dis­as­ter site to lend a help­ing hand, cops have launched an SOS app that al­lows them to en­roll and reach out to a dis­tress caller. The mo­bile app named ‘Shout’ is a part of the Emer­gency Re­sponse Sup­port Sys­tem (ERSS) 112.

The Shout ap­pli­ca­tion is not just for women in dis­tress. It can be used by any­one in case of an emer­gency. A cit­i­zen can reg­is­ter on the ap­pli­ca­tion and be­come a vol­un­teer after com­plet­ing the reg­is­tra­tion. A po­lice ver­i­fi­ca­tion of the vol­un­teer will also be car­ried out. He or she would be sub­se­quently trained and en­cour­aged to at­tend self-de­fence pro­grammes taken up by Delhi Po­lice.

Spe­cial CP (op­er­a­tions) Muk­tesh Chan­der said that

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2An the ap­pli­ca­tion will be avail­able with ERSS 112. “The ap­pli­ca­tion was de­signed keep­ing women safety in mind, but would ap­ply to all other dis­tress sit­u­a­tions,” he said.

Ex­plain­ing the func­tion­ing of the ap­pli­ca­tion, a se­nior po­lice of­fi­cer said: “In case a woman is fac­ing trou­ble in any part of the cap­i­tal, she can press the panic button on the ap­pli­ca­tion. The mo­ment she presses the panic button, top five vol­un­teers who are in the vicin­ity will get an alert and the ap­prox­i­mate lo­ca­tion of the per­son in dis­tress. By track­ing the lo­ca­tion, they can reach the per­son in need or call for fur­ther as­sis­tance.”

Apart from the top five vol­un­teers, the lo­ca­tion of the per­son in dis­tress will also be shared with the near­est emer­gency ve­hi­cle, mo­tor­cy­cle pa­trol, beat staff at po­lice sta­tions, Quick Re­sponse Team (QRT) and Parakram and Prakhar vans. They would also reach the scene in less than five min­utes.

With the help of the ap­pli­ca­tion, not just the com­mon man, but also the law en­force­ment agency can work to­gether to re­duce the re­sponse time.

“Through the ap­pli­ca­tion we also want ci­ti­zens to be proac­tive and help each other. In the na­tional cap­i­tal, peo­ple of­ten do not help each other in times of dis­tress de­spite be­ing at the same lo­ca­tion. On be­com­ing vol­un­teers and get­ting reg­is­tered, they will feel con­fi­dent and act as a help­ing hand to the force in emer­gency sit­u­a­tions,” the of­fi­cer added.

Ear­lier, the po­lice of­fi­cials asked ser­vice providers to en­sure that lo­ca­tion in such cases is shown as pre­cise as pos­si­ble, so that the vol­un­teers as well as the po­lice reach the lo­ca­tion with­out wast­ing any time.

Civil­ians can vol­un­teer to par­tic­i­pate in emer­gency re­sponse by en­rolling through this app, which is part of 112 When a per­son uses 112, an alert goes to vol­un­teers present around the area Hi­machal Pradesh be­comes the first state to launch the pan-In­dia num­ber | | 112 or press the power button on your smart­phone thrice or tap SOS button on 112 app Home min­is­ter Ra­j­nath Singh launches the helpline op­er­a­tor at emer­gency re­sponse cen­tre (ERC) takes the call, notes down your de­tails and for­wards the call to the unit con­cerned | |

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