NSFs re­ject re­vised Sports Code

The Times of India (New Delhi edition) - - Times Sport - Sabi.Hus­[email protected] times­group.com TIMES NEWS NET­WORK

New Delhi: Most of the na­tional sports fed­er­a­tions (NSFs) have sum­mar­ily re­jected the re­vised draft of the Sports Code for good gov­er­nance 2017 in its meet­ing with the In­dian Olympic As­so­ci­a­tion (IOA) here on Thurs­day. A to­tal of 20 NSF rep­re­sen­ta­tives met IOA sec­re­tary gen­eral Ra­jeev Me­hta to protest against ‘con­tentious’ pro­vi­sions of the re­vised draft. The meet­ing was a pre­cur­sor to what’s be­ing con­sid­ered as a show­down be­tween the IOA and sports min­istry of­fi­cials here on Fri­day, when the dis­putable clauses per­tain­ing to bar­ring the min­is­ters, par­lia­men­tar­i­ans, mem­bers of leg­isla­tive as­sem­blies (MLAs) and bureau­crats, apart from the age and ten­ure clause, will come up for dis­cus­sion.

In­ter­est­ingly, IOA pres­i­dent Narinder Ba­tra will be lead­ing the NSF’s charge dur­ing his meet­ing with sports min­is­ter Kiren Ri­jiju even though he was a sig­na­tory to the re­vised draft and was ac­tively in­volved in pro­ceed­ings when the amend­ments were pro­posed.

IOA, too, has strong ob­jec­tion to the clause which brings the na­tional Olympic com­mit­tee in the Sports Code’s sweep. IOA con­sid­ers it as an in­fringe­ment of its au­ton­omy as the body is gov­erned by the IOC’s Olympic Char­ter which doesn’t al­low any gov­ern­ment in­ter­fer­ence. NSFs, on their part, are ob­ject­ing to the pro­vi­sion which is cat­e­goris­ing even the ex­ec­u­tive com­mit­tee and board mem­bers as of­fice-bear­ers.

Ear­lier, only the pres­i­dent, vice pres­i­dent, sec­re­tary gen­eral, joint sec­re­tary and trea­surer were cat­e­gorised as of­fice-bear­ers. NSFs also have their reser­va­tions over the ap­point­ment of CEO and om­buds­man in the fed­er­a­tion set-up. New Delhi: In­dian ath­letes have of­ten com­plained about qual­ity of food and lack of ac­cli­ma­ti­sa­tion when they com­pete in multi-sport events abroad. A case in point was the food is­sue raised by the con­tin­gent dur­ing the 2018 Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires and the two Asi­ads in In­cheon (2014) and Jakarta (2018). How­ever, the athltes may not face such is­sues at the Tokyo Olympics next year.

In a first-of-its-kind ini­tia­tive, the In­dian Olympic As­so­ci­a­tion (IOA), in col­lab­o­ra­tion with the JSW Sports, has de­cided to build the a ‘Hospi­tal­ity House’ at the Sum­mer Games – in Tokyo’s Ari­ake re­gion – which will host watch par­ties, medal cel­e­bra­tions and meet-and-greet op­por­tu­ni­ties with In­dian ath­letes.

Tra­di­tional In­dian sports will be show­cased and vis­i­tors will also get a taste of a va­ri­ety of In­dian cui­sine. A ded­i­cated ath­lete lounge for the In­dian Olympians to feel at home and have ac­cess to med­i­cal fa­cil­i­ties and food will be avail­able. While the food will be free for ath­letes and their support staff, the In­dian pass­port hold­ers trav­el­ling to Tokyo for the Olympics will get ac­cess to the hospi­tal­ity house on a sub­sidised rate af­ter pur­chas­ing the tick­ets.

The hospi­tal­ity house is a joint ini­tia­tive of the In­dian gov­ern­ment, IOA, cor­po­rate In­dia and Public Sec­tor Un­der­tak­ings (PSUs). Sched­uled to be op­er­a­tional from July 2020, the hospi­tal­ity house will be set up over an area of 2,200 sq m in close prox­im­ity to the Games Vil­lage. It’s com­mon for sev­eral par­tic­i­pat­ing na­tions to have their own hospi­tal­ity houses dur­ing a big event.

“The idea first em­anated in 2016 when we saw the hospi­tal­ity houses of USA, France, Swe­den and some other coun­tries. We felt that it would be won­der­ful to have our own In­dia House in Tokyo and that’s where the jour­ney started,” said JSW sports di­rec­tor Parth Jin­dal. IOA pres­i­dent Narinder Ba­tra said In­dia House will be a home away from home for In­dian ath­letes and fans in Tokyo.

TOI

Sports min­is­ter Kiren Ri­jiju at a pro­mo­tional event on Thurs­day

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.